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HIGH SPOTS 

OF 
AMERICAN LITERATURE 



HIGH SPOTS 

OF 

AMERICAN LITERATURE 

by 

<t*kterle Johnson 

Compiler of A Bibliography of Mark Twain, 

A Bibliographic Check List of James Branch Cabdl, 

American First Editions, etc., etc. 



A PRACTICAL BIBLIOGRAPHY AND 
BRIEF LITERARY ESTIMATE OF 
OUTSTANDING AMERICAN BOOKS 



BENNETT BOOK STUDIOS, INC. 
1929 



COPYRIGHT 1929, BY 
PRINTED IW THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 



HIGH SPOTS 

OF 
AMERICAN LITERATURE 



SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

IN THREE PARTS 
PART I 



SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

A COLLECTION IN FIRST EDITION 

HIGH SPOTS, referring to those literary land- 
marks that rise above mediocrity. The Old 
World, through the test of years and culture^ has 
a definite list of such landmarks. The New 
World 5 having been busy with physical moun- 
tains and prairies, now turns to view what emi- 
nences of song and story have been created in the 
march from Ocean to Ocean; the New World seeks 
to know what of aesthetic spirit it possesses, be- 
yond cities and factories and mines. Partly this 
arises from the desire to round out the sense of 
accomplishment and power, partly from a wish 
to preserve in a future of speed and change those 
things from the past that are really of vital or 
eminent worth. 

AMERICAN, in this connection means North 
American (not to confuse with the America South 
of us). Those to the north of us speak the same 
official language, come of the same racial roots, 
have passed through the same pioneer struggles; 
in addition many of their men of literary promi- 
nence have spent years south of the border, and 
have had their works issued first in the United 
States. South America, with its Latin culture 

3 



SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

and language, has yet to develop many world 
recognized voices (though that must soon come) 
and their literature is practically unread as yet 
in North America. 

LITERATURE, in the sense of general and 
permanent interest, as opposed to the importance 
of the moment, scientific or technical; not mere 
records of facts and events, but contributions to 
our understanding of life in the present and fu- 
ture: books containing a point of view as well 
as a narrative; books with the story of human 
emotions, struggles, and aspirations common to 
all the time of man. However, I do not overlook 
the idea that this particular collection, being by 
American authors, should give some picture of 
the American scene. The Scarlet Letter, The Fir- 
ginian, The Covered Wagon, To Have and to Hold, 
among others, paint authentic pictures of history. 
Many of the books in this collection, such as Ben 
Hur and Men of Iron, have no American back- 
ground. Other things being equal, I have chosen 
those which have the American setting; In Ole 
Virginia, Old Creole Days, present pictures of the 
old South; The Covered Wagon, Wolf wile, The Luck 
of Roaring Camp, show the pioneer West; even 
the trail of dialect which will one day simmer 
down to the Great American Language is repre- 
sented in Uncle Remus, The Four Million, Hans 
Breitmann's Party, etc. It is my intention to 

4 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

compile a subsequent list of books important to 
the knowledge of America, which shall include 
such items as Paine's Rights of Man, The Age of 
Reason, Franklin s Autobiography , Mrs. Eddy's 
Science and Healthy Roosevelt's Autobiography, 
The Book of Mormon, Grant's Memoirs, etc. ; books 
which in their time have influenced the life and, 
more important, the thoughts of hundreds of 
thousands of Americans. 

FIRST EDITION. The books in this collec- 
tion are the first printing and in the original bind- 
ing, so far as can be ascertained. Here sentiment 
enters in ! In front of you is Tom Sawyer, square, 
blue-covered. Just as it thrilled Grandfather as 
a boy to hold it bright and new with its "freight" 
of Adventures, so it thrills Grandson to hold one 
of the precious few that have escaped the wear 
and tear of countless readings. There are the two 
volumes of the story that hastened the march of 
a million feet Uncle Tom's Cabin. This thin 
modest number from Wiley and Putnam's Library 
is whence radium-like the genius of Poe has stimu- 
lated the imagination of the world. That squat 
book in ridiculous flower-design binding contains 
the story of Ben Hur, chariot racer extraordinary, 
who continues to speed in play, story, and picture 
before countless thousands. One of these thin 
pamphlets is the birthplace of Rip Van Winkle, 
who woke to find himself immortal ! 

5 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Most great books are rare In first editions. That 
is because generations of readers have thumbed to 
pieces all but a few of the original copies. Of 
late years the practice of higher-priced, limited 
issues on permanent paper has placed directly in 
the hands of collectors a large number of fine 
books that will not go through the mill of re- 
peated reading and trips to junk shops. But 
these anticipated aristocrats are not always the 
ones of great power. The famous book of to- 
morrow may today be in process of printing on 
poor and perishable paper in some job printer's 
cellar in a country town, and reach its renown 
only after all but a few of the original copies have 
disappeared. 

Scarcity is incidental to this collection of first 
editions. Poe's Tamerlane is perhaps the scarcest 
American book of a renowned author. Yet it 
has no place in a list of great and readable books. 
Analysing the elements that make for the lon- 
gevity of books, we have the "extension of per- 
sonality" or as others phrase it "the literature 
of escape/ 5 in which the reader identifies himself 
with the hero who accomplishes the wonderful 
things which the reader would enjoy or possibly 
has dreamed of doing. Thus Jurgen, the humble 
pawn-broker, becomes the lover of queens; Ben 
Hur wins the chariot race; Leather Stocking un- 
erringly hits a mark the size of a hazelnut; Tom 
Sawyer defies authority, and finds treasure in the 

6 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

cave: and so on. Another element of lasting ap- 
peal is exemplified in the "adventure" story which 
takes the reader away from the humdrum events 
of his daily existence. Such are Moby Dick, 
Where Angels Fear to Tread, perhaps London's 
Call of the Wild. Reminiscence of childhood has 
perennial charm for older readers, and so we 
have The Old Swimming Hole, Little Women, The 
Court of Boyville, The Story of a Bad Boy, etc. 
The saving grace of humor has kept many a brain- 
child from "honorable oblivion." Whether it is 
in the form of satire, burlesque, or practical joke, 
the tale with a humorous or whimsical turn has 
a good chance for survival. 

Here arises the question of the so-called "real- 
istic" books of the present generation, marvelous 
depictions, they may be, of life in drab or tragic 
aspects, perhaps not inspirational, except by con- 
trast. Useful, necessary, almost surgical in as- 
pect, they have their time and place. The only 
question is of permanence. We list our Dreisers, 
Lewises, and Andersons, full of hope for the fu- 
ture, realizing their insight and power, but unable 
to foresee if, or no, "Pollyanna" may be a house- 
hold word years after their names have been for- 
gotten. 

THE SELECTION OF THIS LIST: In part 
it is the classified verdict of the reading public 

7 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

over the years; in part it is the recommendations 
of persons presumed to qualify as experts in lit- 
erature; in a small measure it is my own prefer- 
ence. Where the author is of special importance 
or has diversified styles, more than one title is 
given. (Where too many books by one author 
have been proposed I sometimes fear that that 
author has failed to score a direct hit.) 

AS TO WHY SO MANY BOOKS ARE 
NAMED, permitting the inclusion of so many 
interesting, readable, but admittedly minor items, 
I give you a quotation from an editorial in the 
Washington Post for December 24, 1927: 

"A Stickler for the high things of literature objects 
to the proposed honor to the memory of Mrs. Burnett, 
author of Little Lord Fauntleroy, not because of her 
invention of the little lord, with his curls and velvets, 
but because, in his judgment, she was * never anything 
but a third-rate author, with about the evaluation of 
life of a high school sophomore/ Regarding that 
categorical and dogmatic condemnation, it is possible 
that opinions may vary widely. It might be urged, 
also, that it is not always feasible to measure literary 
merit in terms of pure mathematics. Macaulay tried 
that method sometimes, and, when he did, invariably 
failed. Furthermore, if it is only to litterateurs of the 
first magnitude that memorials are to be erected, then 
the memorials will be, like the proverbial angels* visits, 
few and far between/* 

8 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Finality is far from my mind in this collection; 
it is a foundation, not a finished structure. Lit- 
erature is a thing of life, growth, not of settled 
forms. The collection caters to no school of lit- 
erary prejudice. It is as if I had the job of going 
over the countless manuscripts in a literary com- 
petition, eliminating the distinctly inferior, re- 
ducing the lot to a reasonable number for final 
review by the prize-giving judges. The judges 
in this case are the men and women of the future 
whose names we do not know and whose faces 
we shall not see. But the fascination of minor 
prophecy moves me, though I know not whether 
the years call me false or true ! 



GEORGE ADE 
1866 

Fables | (rule) | In | (rule) J Slang | (rule) | 
by | George | Ade | Illustrated | by [ Clyde 
J. | Newman | (rule) | Published by | Her- 
bert, S. Stone | and Company | Chicago & 
New York | MDCCCC 

"Fables in Slang" in red, balance in black, enclosed 
in pictorial border. This title is the unusual double 
page, starting the right hand page with "Illustrated." 
It appears to be hand-drawn. 

Later issues have the number of thousands foot of 
copyright page. 

Fables in this case means foibles, American foibles, as seen by 
Ade in 1900. Equally successful pictures of the foibles of suc- 
ceeding periods are in his later collections of fables under different 
titles. 

LOUISA MAY ALCOTT 

1832-1888 

Little Women | or, | Meg, Jo, Beth And Amy | 
By Louisa M. Alcott | Illustrated By May 
Alcott | Boston | Roberts Brothers | 1868 
ii 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Little Women | or j Meg, Jo, Beth And 
Amy \ Part Second | By Louisa M. Alcott | 
With Illustrations [ Boston 1 Roberts Broth- 
ers 1 1869 

Little Men: | Life At Plumfield With Jo's 
Boys. | By | Louisa M. Alcott, | Author 
of "Little Women/ 3 "An Old-Fashioned 
Girl/' | "Hospital Sketches/' | (ornament) | 
Boston: | Roberts Brothers. | 1871. 

Bound variously in green or dark red cloth, lettered 
in gilt. 

It may be there are still other colors of the cloth. 

Famous juveniles of our Victorian Age, before flappers learned to 
flap. 

THOMAS BAILEY ALDRICH 

1836-1907 

The | Story of a Bad Boy | by | Thomas Bai- 
ley Aldrich. j With Illustrations. | (pub- 
lishers' monogram) | Boston: | Fields, Os- 
good, & Co. | 1870. 

Aldrich was a well known writer of both prose and poetry and 
personally of scintillating wit, but this story of his own boyhood 
seems destined to survive the balance of his output. 

12 



J) 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

JAMES LANE ALLEN 
1849-1925 

Flute and Violin I And Other Kentucky Tales | 
And Romances. By James I Lane Allen. 
Illustrated | (portrait head by Pyle) | New 
York | Harper & Brothers | MDCCCXCI 



C| A Kentucky Cardinal | A Story | by | James 
Lane Allen | Author of "The Blue-Grass 

Region of Kentucky" | "Flute and Violin" 
** Etc. j Illustrated | (publishers' seal in red) j 

^ New York | Harper & Brothers Publishers j 
1895 

* Aftermath | Part Second of | "A Kentucky 

\ Cardinal" | by | James Lane Allen | Author 

<Q of | "The Blue-Grass Region of Kentucky" | 

-*- "Flute and Violin" Etc. | (publishers' seal 

Cr in red) | New York | Harper & Brothers 

Publishers | 1896 

*Q Pictures of the neglected epoch in America before the great re- 
^*> bellion, invested with a bit of heart and dramatic interest. 
) Flute and Violin is placed first because there seems to be power 
and drama in some of these short stories beyond the setting. 

13 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

SHERWOOD ANDERSON 

1876 

Winesburg, Ohio | A Group of Tales of | Ohio 
Small Town Life | by | Sherwood Ander- 
son | (publisher's seal) | New York | B. W. 
Huebsch | MCMXIX 

Enclosed in single line border with panel lines below 
third and fifth lines and publisher's seal. 

First issue has top stained yellow. I have observed 
a break in the title-page rule border in the second 
issues. 

The Triumph of the Egg j A Book of Impres- 
sions | From American Life | In Tales and 
Poems | by | Sherwood Anderson | In Clay 
by | Tennessee Mitchell | (publisher's seal) | 
(quotation, six lines, from "Mid-American 
Chants") | Photographs by Eugene Hutch- 
inson | New York B. W. Huebsch, Inc. 
MCMXXI 

First issue has top stained yellow. 

A Story Teller's Story | The tale of an Amer- 
ican writer's journey | through his own 
imaginative world and | through the world 
14 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

of facts, with many of | his experiences and 
impressions among other | writers told 
in many notes in four books | and an 
Epilogue. | Sherwood Anderson j (publisher's 
seal) | New York B. W. Huebsch, Inc. 
Mcmxxiv 

Enclosed in double line border. 

The first two books are collections of sketches of Mid-West people 
and scenes; A Story Teller's Story is autobiography with much the 
same people and scenes. Frankly, the three books are here because 
I felt that Anderson's picture of these people and scenes should be 
in the collection, but was unable to make a definite choice of one 
book. 

WILLIAM BEEBE 

1877 

Jungle Peace | by | William Beebe | Curator 
of Birds, New York Zoological Park, and | 
Director of Tropical Research Station | 
Illustrated from Photographs | (publishers* 
seal) | New York | Henry Holt and Com- 
pany | 1918 

The first edition does not have the foreword by 
Theodore Roosevelt. 

Nature's drama in the Tropics set down by a writer who sees both 
with the eye of a naturalist and a human being. I choose this one 

15 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

of Beebe's books because it was chosen by that great naturalist and 
human being, T. R., and what was good enough for Teddy is good 
enough for me. 



EDWARD BELLAMY 
1850-1898 

Looking Backward | 2000-1887 I by | Ed- 
ward Bellamy | Author of "Miss Luding- 
ton's Sister"; "Dr. HeidenhofFs Process"; | 
"A Nantucket Idyl," &c., &c. | (publishers' 
seal) | Boston | Ticknor and Company | 
211 Tremont Street. | 1888 



Issued in three colors of cloth. 

Fanciful sketch of civilization to come with many of its predic- 
tions (1928) already come true. 

AMBROSE BIERCE 

1842-1914 

Tales | of | Soldiers and Civilians | by | Am- 
brose Bierce | San Francisco [ E. L. G. 
Steele j 208 California Street | 1891. 

Chronicler of the bizarre his mystery or psycho- 
logical story "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge/* 
from this volume of short stories, had the honor to be 
included in Carolyn Wells's collection (1923) of the ten 
best mystery tales of all time. 

16 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

WILLIAM CULLEN BRYANT 
1794-1878 

Poems | by | William Cullen Bryant. | (double 
rule) | Cambridge: | Printed by Milliard 
and Metcalf. | 1821. 

My copy measures seven and three-quarter inches in 
height. 

Through vagaries of early book production there 
seem to be copies of varying sizes. It would be diffi- 
cult to make it a point of issue. 

Bryant spent many years at Literature, but penned nothing more 
powerful than the "Thanatopsis" of his early youth, contained in 
this volume. 

HENRY CUYLER BUNNER 
1855-1896 

"Short Sixes " \ Stories to be Read While the 
Candle Burns | by | H. C. Bunner | Author 
of "Airs from Arcady" "The Midge" etc. | 
Illustrated by | C. Jay Taylor, F. Opper and 
S. B. Griffin | Puck | Keppler & Schwarz- 
mann | New York | 1891 

It is difficult to determine a first edition as the pub- 
lishers reprinted the book many years from the same 
plates without changing the date. 

17 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

The sheets of a copy with written inscription dated 
"Christmas, 1890" measure 7 inches by $% inches. In 
other copies I have noted many type defects: as, broken 
type first letters of the right hand words, paragraph foot 
of p. 82; page number, p. 97, etc., etc., which do not oc- 
cur in the copy here described. 

A collection of short stories of delicate humor. 

FRANCES HODGSON BURNETT 

1849-1924 

Little Lord Fauntleroy | by | Frances Hodg- 
son Burnett | (illustration) | New- York | 
Charles Scribner's Sons | 1886 

Some copies bear the De Vinne printer's imprint, and 
others are from the press of J. J. Little. As Little 
printed the second and later editions it is possible the 
De Vinne is first. 

The joys and woes of a poor little rich boy of the mauve decade. 

Loathed by all the now grown men whose mothers, influenced by 
the book, clothed them in plush suits and wide white collars but 
still has a heart-compelling interest in the fortunes of the "Little 
Lord." 

GELETT BURGESS 

1866 

The Purple | Cow! (San Francisco) (1895) 
Title is included in pictorial design on outside page. 



Without covers measures 7^ by 5^ inches* 
18 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

The high spot of American nonsense verse of which this pamphlet 
carries seven other rhymes besides the little couplets. 

Are You a Bromide ? | or, j The Sulphitic 
Theory | Expounded and Exemplified Ac- 
cording | To the Most Recent Researches | 
Into the Psychology of | Boredom | In- 
cluding Many Well-known Bromidioms | 
Now in Use | by | Gelett Burgess, S. B. | 
Author of "Goops and How to be Them/' 
"The | Burgess Nonsense Book/' " Vivette," 
&c., &c. | With Decorations by the Author | 
New York | B. W. Huebsch | 1906 

Title enclosed in decorative border in red. 

Nonsense philosophy the title of which has joined the American 
language. 

JOHN BURROUGHS 

1837-1921 

Wake-Robin | by | John Burroughs | (pub- 
lishers 5 seal) | New York | Published by 
Hurd and Houghton | Cambridge: River- 
side Press | 1871 

Decorative head-piece above "Wake-Robin." 
"W" and "R" in Wake-Robin, background of pub- 

19 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

lishers' seal, and "Cambridge: Riverside Press" in 
red, balance in black. 

Copies exist with and without a pictorial design on 
the side covers. 

Nature and philosophy combined. Burroughs said in late years 
that he could not tell why this had been his most popular book. 

ELLIS PARKER BUTLER 

1869 

Pigs Is Pigs | by | Ellis Parker Butler | (pub- 
lishers' seal) | Illustrations by Will Craw- 
ford | New York | McClure, Phillips & 
Co. | MCMVI 

Title enclosed in single line border. 

A short sketch of a station-master's dilemma, with a title destined 
to be quoted for generations. 

WILLIAM ALLEN BUTLER 

1825-1902 

Nothing To Wear: | An Episode of City Life. | 
(From Harpers Weekly.) | (rule) | Illus- 
trated by Hoppin. | New York: | Rudd 
& Carleton, 310 Broadway. | (rule) | 
MDCCCLVIL 

Title entirely in red. 

20 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE _ 

Butler was a lawyer who wrote for diversion and the theme of 
this amusing poem has been told of all femininity from Eve to Ever- 
lasting. 

JAMES BRANCH CABELL 
1879 

Jurgen | A Comedy of Justice | by j James 
Branch Cabell | (quotation, five lines) ( 
New York | Robert M. McBride & Co. j 
1919 

"Jurgen" is apparently hand-lettered with "A 
Comedy of Justice" between lines. 

Measures i^ inches across top including covers. 

A study of the average man's delusions of grandeur and power. 
Various of these delusions are concerned a bit spectacularly with the 
fair sex, on account of which the book was suppressed for a time. 

GEORGE W. CABLE 

1844-1925 

Old Creole Days | by 1 George W. Cable | 
New York | Charles Scribner's Sons | 743 
and 745 Broadway | 1879 

Issued in two or more colors of cloth. 

Six short stories concerned with old Creole days and the Louisiana 
scene. 

21 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

WILL CARLETON 
1845-1912 

Farm Ballads. | by Will Carleton. | Illus- 
trated. | (publishers' seal) | New York: | 
Harper & Brothers, Publishers, | Franklin 
Square. | 1873. 

Carleton was once the popular "Poet of the People" but what has 
survived is "Over the Hill to the Poorhouse" contained in the above 
collection. 



WILLA GATHER 
1875 

My Antonia | by | Willa Sibert Cather | (quo- 
tation, one line, Virgil) | With Illustrations 
by | W. T. Benda | (publishers' seal) | 
Boston and New York | Houghton Mifflin 
Company | The Riverside Press Cam- 
bridge | 1918 

A study of the second wave of American pioneer life in the middle 
west the emigrant direct there from overseas; a balanced picture, 
without the over emphasis of the drab as in our "realistic" writers. 



22 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 



SAMUEL L. CLEMENS 



"MARK TWAIN 



1835-1910 

The Adventures | of | Tom Sawyer | by f 
Mark Twain. | (rule) | The American 
Publishing Company, | Hartford, Conn.: 
Chicago, 111.: Cincinnati, Ohio. I A Ro- 
man & Co., San Francisco, CaL | 1876. 

Measures one inch across top of covers, and verso 
of preface page is blank. Issued in blue cloth and vari- 
ous leathers. This and the following two titles were 
first issued in England for copyright purposes, but I 
prefer the American edition. 

Recognized as one of the supreme portrayals of boy character. 

Adventures | of | Huckleberry Finn | (Tom 
Sawyer's Comrade). | Scene: The Missis- 
sippi Valley. | Time: Forty to Fifty Years 
Ago, ] by | Mark Twain. | With One Hun- 
dred and Seventy-Four Illustrations. | 
New York: | Charles L. Webster and 
Company. | 1885. 

In the first bound copies, page 283 is pasted on a 
stub. Issued in green or blue cloth and various leathers. 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

The companion and defacto sequel to "Tom Sawyer," "Huckle- 
serry Finn" is regarded by some as in itself the great American 
aovel; but I prefer to list the two books as an inseparable pair with- 
out admitting the superiority of the later book. 

The Tragedy of ( PudcTnhead Wilson | And 
the Comedy j Those Extraordinary Twins | 
by | Mark Twain | (Samuel L. Clemens) | 
With Marginal Illustrations. | (ornament) ( 
1894 | Hartford, Conn. | American Pub- 
lishing Company. 

"Pudd'nhead Wilson" and "With Marginal Illus- 
trations," in red, balance in black. Issued in brown 
cloth and various leathers. 

One of the great mystery and detective stories. 

"Eve's Diary" and "The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg" are 
examples of Mark Twain's other styles. 

JAMES FENIMORE COOPER 

1789-1851 

The Last | of | the Mohicans; | a narrative of 
I I7S7- I by the author of "the Pioneers". 
| (rule) | (two line quotation) | (rule) | in 
two volumes. | Vol. I. [Vol. II.] (double 
rule) | Philadelphia: | H. C. Carey & L Lea 
Chestnut-Street. | (rule) | 1826. 

Exaggeratedly romantic tale of Colonial America, but with the 
tremendous interest of our forefather's struggle with the savage in 
man and nature. 

24 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

The "Leather-Stocking" Tales, built around the character from 
which the tales are named, are five in number: "The Deer-slayer/* 
"The Last of the Mohicans," "The Pathfinder," "The Pioneers," 
and "The Prairie." On these the fame of Cooper is based, and the 
popular mind has singled out "The Last of the Mohicans" when 
Leather-Stocking was in the prime of manhood, for its favorite. 

"The Spy," a story of the Revolution, and "The Bravo," the 
story of Paul Jones, are others of Copper's works still cited. 



STEPHEN CRANE 
1870-1900 

The Red Badge | Of Courage J (ornament) 1 
An Episode of the American Civil War | 
(ornaments) | by | (ornaments) | Stephen 
Crane | (ornaments) | (publishers' seal) | 
(ornaments) | (ornaments) | New York | 
D. Appleton and Company [ 1895 

Ornaments in red, balance in black. 

The first issue has perfect type, last line page 225. 

A writer whose power was only recognized in his own country 
when a Pole, Joseph Conrad, pointed out his worth as a great con- 
tributor to Literature. "The Red Badge of Courage" is a novel of 
war by America's first great realist. " Maggie, A Girl of the Streets " 
was his original attempt in the field of realism but was not quite so 
well rounded a bit of artistry as the above title. 

War is | Kind by | Stephen | Crane j (orna- 
ment) | Drawings | by Will | Bradley | 
New York | Frederick A | Stokes Com- 
pany | MDCCCXCIX 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Title enclosed in ornamental border with panel lines 
under "Crane/* "ornament," "Bradley," and above 
"Drawings" and "New York." 

Short poems in what would be called the modern manner. "The 
Black Riders" was his first volume of verse, but the poems in "War 
is Kind/' especially the title poem, are held to be more artistic. 

The "Blue Hotel" in the collection of short stories entitled "The 
Monster" and "The Open Boat" in the collection by that name 
have been widely praised as remarkable stories. 



GEORGE WILLIAM CURTIS 

1824-1892 

Prue and I. | by | George William Curtis. | 
(rule) | (quotation, one line, Twelfth 
Night) 1 (rule) j New York: | Dix, Ed- 
wards & Co., 321 Broadway. | 1856. 

Issued in various colors of cloth. 

A series of pleasant essays strung together on the theme of the 
man of culture and understanding in humble circumstances whose 
wife mirabile dictu sympathizes with his day dreams and quiet 
philosophy. 

RICHARD HENRY DANA, JR. 

1815-1882 

Two Years | Before the Mast. | A | Personal 
Narrative of | Life at Sea. | (rule) | (quota- 
tion, five lines, Coleridge's Wallenstein.) | 
26 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

(rule) | New York: [ Harper & Brothers 
82 Cliff-Street, j (rule) \ 1840. 

Published as number CVI of Harper's Family Li- 
brary. The list of this library on the back cover 
reaches only number 105. This volume is in tan 
cloth. There is also a black cloth cover which may 
be also on the first sheets for a different circulation. 

On the surface a mere narrative corresponding to the title, but 
with underlying qualities of imagination and power that place it as 
a book with literary merit. 

MARGARET DELAND 

1857 

Old Chester Tales | by | Margaret Deland [ 
With Illustrations by | Howard Pyle j 
(publishers' seal) | Harper & Brothers 
Publishers | New York and London | 1899 

Title enclosed in double line. Panel line under 
first, third, and fifth lines, and publishers' seal. 

Mrs. Deland, in a letter dated 1899, wishes her pub- 
lishers to correct an error on p. 5, where "Chester" ap- 
pears as "Chelsea." This is the sixth line from the 
foot of the page. Also in the first printings the titles 
of Mary E. Wilkins books, first page of advertisement 
at the back, are in small caps, later corrected to large 
caps, corresponding to the style of the other advertise- 
ment. 

Short stories of a small town of New England in the horse and 
carriage age. Woven about the village minister and the human 
problems which must be met with insight and without dogma. 

27 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

EMILY DICKINSON 
1830-1886 

The Single Hound | Poems of a Lifetime I 
by | Emily Dickinson | With an Introduc- 
tion by her Niece | Martha Dickinson 
Bianchi j (publishers 5 seal) | Boston | 
Little, Brown, and Company | 1914 

Short poems written in the I9th century in the aoth century man- 
ner. 

MARY MAPES DODGE 

1838-1905 

Hans Brinker; | or, j The Silver Skates. ( 
A Story of Life in Holland. | by M. E. 
Dodge, | Author of "The Irvington 
Stories/' | Illustrated by | F. O. C. Dar- 
ley and Thomas Nast. | (publishers' mono- 
gram) | New York: j James O'Kane, 126 
Nassau Street. | M.DCCCLXVL 

"H" and "B" of "Hans Brinker" and publishers' 
monogram in red. Balance in black. 

A story of boy and girl life in Holland read and beloved by mil- 
lions of American boys and girls. 

28 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

JOHN DOS PASSOS 
1896 

Three j Soldiers | John j Dos Passos ( New 
York | George H. Doran Company | [1921] 

Title hand lettered. Author's name incorporated 
into design, lettering in white, design in black. 

First (and foremost) of the war-disillusion novels. 

THEODORE DREISER 

1871 

Sister Carrie | by j Theodore Dreiser | (orna- 
ment) | New York | Doubleday, Page & 
Co. | 1900 

Title enclosed in double line border. Double line 
panel under "Theodore Dreiser" and ornament. 

Modern American realism when it was a pup; spades called spades 
before it became fashionable. 

Jennie | Gerhardt | A Novel | by | Theodore 
Dreiser | Author of | "Sister Carrie" | 
(publishers' seal) | Harper & Brothers 
Publishers I New York and London | 

M-C-M-X-I 

29 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Title enclosed in single line border. Inner single 
line borders around "Jennie Gerhardt," "A Novel by 
Theodore Dreiser" (etc.) publishers' seal, and pub- 
lishers' name and date. 

In the first issue, "end" at end of line 8, p. 89, is perfect correspond- 
ing to the type in "ending" at left end of same line. It is said the 
first binding had only "Dreiser" on the back strip, but I have seen 
the later sheets also in that binding. 

An American | Tragedy | by | Theodore 
Dreiser | Volume One [Volume Two] | 
(publishers' seal) | New York | Boni & 

Liveright | MCMXXV 

Title enclosed in decorative border. 
The small paper edition was published two months 
before the signed edition on large paper. 

As with Sherwood Anderson, I twitter among the lava flows from 
the Dreiser volcano, and list three for fear of being called "reac- 
tionary." I am almost persuaded to include "The Genius" for 
extra measure. 



FINLEY PETER DUNNE 
1867 

Mr. Dooley | In Peace and in War | (orna- 
ment) | Boston | Small, Maynard & Com- 
pany | 1898 

Dunne puts into the mouth of Dooley, the Irish saloon-keeper, 
his humorous satires on American events and politics. Each article 

30 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

is short, with a never failing "snapper" at the end. I choose this 
collection simply because it contains "On Our Hero in Politics/* 
the same being Theodore Roosevelt. 



EDWARD EGGLESTON 
1837-1902 

The [ Hoosier School-Master, j A Novel. | 
by | Edward Eggleston. | With Twenty- 
Nine Illustrations. | New York: | Orange 
Judd and Company, | 245 Broadway. 
[1871] 

The Hoosier | School-Boy | by | Edward Eg- 
gleston | Illustrated | New York: | Orange 
Judd Company | 751 Broadway | 1883. 

Another copy of this book has the Charles Scrib- 
ner's Sons imprint, dated the same year. Both the 
Orange Judd and the Scribner books carry Scribner 
advertisements. Another mystery ! 

The Hoosier School-Master is reputed to be Eggleston's great 
book, but I like the "School-boy" and claim the two can be regarded 
as one book. 

Eggleston also wrote "The Circuit Rider," a story of the itinerant 
missionary-preacher in the pioneer middle west. I consider, how- 
ever, that this book belongs in my other collection of American his- 
torical works. 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

RALPH WALDO EMERSON 

1803-1882 

Essays: | by | R. W. Emerson. | (rule) | Bos- 
ton: | James Munroe and Company. ( 
(rule) 1 MDCCCXLI. 

Essays on " Self-Reliance," "Friendship," and kindred themes by 
America's first great philosopher. It is possible that one should 
also have "Essays, Second Series" to complete the work. 

EUGENE FIELD 
1850-1895 

A Little Book | of | Western Verse | by | Eu- 
gene Field 1 Chicago | MDCCCLXXXIX 

''Western Verse" and "Chicago" in red, balance in 
black. 

Two hundred and fifty copies only. 

Contains the immortal "Little Boy Blue." 

A Little Book | of | Profitable Tales j by | 
Eugene Field | Chicago | MDCCCLXXXIX 

"Profitable Tales" and "Chicago" in red, balance 
in black. 

Two hundred and fifty copies only. 

These are prose skits, amusing and typical of American columnists 
of whom Mark Twain and Eugene Field were pioneers. It is in- 

32 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

eluded here mainly because the two books listed above were pub- 
lished as a "pair," and to give a side light on Field's character. 



PAUL LEICESTER FORD 
1865-1902 

The Honorable | Peter Stirling [ and | What 
People Thought of Him | by | Paul Leices- 
ter Ford | (publishers' seal) | New York | 
Henry Holt and Company | 1894 

The career of Grover Cleveland fictionized. 
It is said that "The Great K. & A. Train-Robbery" by the same 
author is one of the really good detective stories. 



JOHN FOX, JR. 

1862-1919 

The Trail of the | Lonesome Pine | by [ 
John Fox, Jr. | Illustrated by F. C. Yohn | 
Charles Scribner's Sons | New York (orna- 
ments) 1908 

Title enclosed in single line border. Title, author's 
and illustrator's names, publishers' name and date 
enclosed in inner single boxes. 

Genteel thriller of Kentucky moon-shine and mountain feud. 
33 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

HAROLD FREDERIC 

1856-1898 

In The Valley | by | Harold Frederic | Illus- 
trated by Howard Pyle | New York | 
Charles Scribner's Sons | 1890 

Historical novel with climax centered on the battle of Saratoga, 

The | Damnation of Theron Ware | by | 
Harold Frederic | (publishers' seal) j Chi- 
cago | Stone & Kimball | MDCCCXCVI 

"Damnation of Theron Ware" and publishers' seal 
in red, balance in black. 

Said to be the first of the modern "problem novels." 

ROBERT FROST 

1875 

North of Boston | by | Robert Frost | Au- 
thor of "A Boy's Will" | London | David 
Nutt | 17 Grape Street Editorial: | New 
Oxford Street 6 Bloomsbury Street | W. C 



Small vertical line dividing the seventh and eighth 
lines after the word "street" in each line. 

Distributed in America with a slight variation in 
binding but no change of imprint. 

34 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

In my desire to mention specific poems, I will cite In this book, 
"Mending the Wall," "The Death of the Hired Man," and "The 
Wood Pile." 



HAMLIN GARLAND 
1860 

A Pioneer Mother | by | Hamlin Garland | 
(ornament) | Chicago | The Bookfellows | 
1922 

Ornament in red. Twenty-five tall paper copies 
and five hundred small paper copies. 

An epic of the conquest of the American west in a tribute by a 
son who appreciates the part played by American motherhood. 

Main-Travelled Roads | Six Mississippi Val- 
ley Stories | by | Hamlin Garland | Bos- 
ton, Mass. | Arena Publishing Company | 
1891 

Issued in wrappers, title repeated on covers with 
"Arena Library. Vol. I, No. 2. Price 50 cents." 
across the top and "First Thousand." across the 
bottom. 



Short stories of the Middle West before it had Chautauqua circles 
and prosperity; the physical toil endured by the Pioneer ennobled to 
a species of silent heroism. 

35 



MGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

EDWARD EVERETT HALE 
1822-1909 

"he | Man Without a Country. | (publishers' 
seal) | Boston: | Ticknor and Fields. | 
1865. 

Issued in wrappers. There is a whisper about a 
attain small slip of errata or something which should 
o with the first printing. Nothing has yet been 
efinitely established in regard to a point of issue. 

A dramatic sketch of a man who spends his life atoning for a hot- 
;aded moment of his youth. 

JOEL CHANDLER HARRIS 

1848-1908 

Jncle Remus | His Songs and His Sayings | 
The Folk-Lore of the Old Plantation j 
(portrait vignette) | By Joel Chandler 
Harris | With Illustrations by Frederick 
S. Church and | James H. Moser | New 
York | D. Appleton and Company | i, 3, 
and 5 Bond Street | 1881 

The first issue does not contain a review of the 
ook at the end. 

Folk tales of the negro south, retold with sympathetic humor. 

36 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

BERT HARTE 
1839-1902 

The | Luck of Roaring Camp, j And | Other 
Sketches. | by | Francis Bret Harte. \ (pub- 
lishers' monogram) | Boston: | Fields, Os- 
good, & Co. | 1870. 

Later printings contain an added story, "Brown of 
Calaveras," listed in the index. 

The first stories written by a westerner about the westerners in 
the western vernacular, the earlier western writers being so afraid 
of being called "unliterary" that they ignored the crude but power- 
ful material at hand. I feel that Harte's other prose stories are to 
a great degree feebler successors to this first success. 

Poems. | by | Bret Harte. | (publishers' mono- 
gram) | Boston: | Fields, Osgood, & Co. | 
1871. 

The first issue has Fields, Osgood monogram on 
backstrip identical with monogram on title-page. 

This volume contains, among others, "Plain Language from Truth- 
ful James," "The Society Upon the Stanislaus," "To the Pliocene 
Skull," and "Her Letter." One or two of these have appeared 
previously, but here they are together. 



37 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE 
1804-1864 

The | Scarlet Letter, | A Romance. | by 1 
Nathaniel Hawthorne. | Boston: | Tick- 
nor, Reed, and Fields- | MDCCCL. 

"Scarlet Letter," in red, balance in black. 

"Scarlet Letter" on title measures one eighth inch 
shorter than later issues. 

Page 21, line 20, "reduplicate/ 5 

Page 48, line 8, "or the shade." 

Why the first edition should have the publishers* 
advertisements of March 1850, and the second edition 
those of 1849 remains unanswered. 

The old story of the girl who loved not wisely but too well, set 
in the stark background of Puritan New England. 

Twice-Told Tales. | by | Nathaniel Haw- 
thorne. | (publishers' seal) | Boston: | 
American Stationers Co. | John B. Rus- 
sell. | 1837. 

The sheets of my copy measure seven and three- 
quarter inches tall. Perhaps that is the mark of the 
first edition ? 

"A Rill from the Town Pump" seems to be the celebrated con- 
tribution to this collection of sketches. Perhaps Hawthorne is 
better remembered for popularizing Greek myths in his "Wonder 
Book." 

38 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

JOHN HAY 
1838-1905 

Jim Bludso | Of the Prairie Belle, j and [ 
Little Breeches. | by John Hay. | With 
Illustrations by S. Eytinge, Jr. | (pub- 
lishers' monogram) | Boston: | James R. 
Osgood and Company, | Late Ticknor & 
Fields, and Fields, Osgood, & Co. | 1871. 

Title enclosed in single line border. 

Hay was secretary to Abraham Lincoln and wrote, with Nicolay, 
an exhaustive story of the martyr President. But Hay will be re- 
membered in literature chiefly by "Jim Bludso " and "Little 
Breeches," instinct with native American humor. 



LAFCADIO HEARN 

1850-1904 

Some | Chinese Ghosts. | by ( Lafcadio 
Hearn, | (ornament) | Boston: | Roberts 
Brothers. | 1887. 

Bindings of several colors. 

Here we have Hearn's first study of the legendary orient. Later 
he wrote many things concerning the traditions of Japan, but noth- 
ing superior to these sketches. 

39 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Two Years | in the | French West Indies 1 
By Lafcadio Hearn | Author of "Chita" 
Etc. | Illustrated | (publishers' seal) | New 
York | Harper & Brothers, Franklin 
Square | 1890 

Hearn's best piece of work before leaving these United States for 
the orient. He combines here with his travelogue, stories equal 
or superior to the separately printed "Youma" and "Chita." 

O. HENRY 

[WILLIAM SYDNEY PORTER] 
1862-1910 

The | Four Million | by | O. Henry [ Author 
of 1 Cabbages and Kings | (publishers 3 
seal) | New York | McCIure, Phillips & 

Co. | MCMVI 

Title enclosed in double line border. 

Short stories by the master of the short story. The high spot 
of the collection is held to be "The Gift of the Magi." Another 
story termed a masterpiece, "A Municipal Report," is found in the 
volume, "Strictly Business." But why go on ? There are so many 
great "O. Henry Stories" ! 

JOSEPH HERGESHEIMER 

1880 

The | Three Black Pennys | A Novel [ by | 
Joseph Hergesheimer | New York (pub- 
40 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

lisher's seal) MCMXVII | (rule) | Alfred 
(ornament) A. (ornament) Knopf 

25 copies of the first edition were bound altogether 
uncut. 

The first real correlation of the American struggle to success or 
failure with our huge native resources the human element com- 
batting the economic. Hergesheimer has also done this in "Glass" 
and "Steel'* which curiously enough have never seen book publica- 
tion. 

The [ Presbyterian | Child | (ornament) | 
Joseph Hergesheimer | (ornament) J New 
York | Alfred A. Knopf | 1923 

Title enclosed in decorative border designed by 
Bruce Rogers. 

Sketches of the esteemed author's relatives, told with appreciation 
and almost humor. A lesson in valuing our necessary human sur- 
roundings of the blood-is-thicker-than-water variety. 

OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES 

1809-1894 

The Autocrat | of the | Breakfast-Table. | 
Every man his own Boswell. | Boston: j 
Phillips, Sampson and Company. J 
MDCCCLVIII. 

"The Autocrat/' "Breakfast-Table/' publishers' 
name in red, balance in black. 

41 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

The engraved fore-title is not included in later issues. 

Happy essays which include the immortal poem, "The One Hoss 
Shay." 

Elsie Vernier: | A Romance of Destiny, J 
by Oliver Wendell Holmes, | Author of 
"The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table/' 
etc. | In Two Volumes. I Volume I. [Vol- 
ume IL] | Boston: | Ticknor and Fields. | 
MDCCCLXL 

A novel of pre-natal influence; in which Holmes utilizes his knowl- 
edge as a physician. 

EMERSON HOUGH 

1857-1923 

The | Covered Wagon | by | Emerson 
Hough | Author of "The Story of the 
Cow- | Boy," "The Magnificent Adven- 
ture," | "The Mississippi Bubble," "The 
Sage- | Brusher," Etc. \ (publishers' 
seal) | D. Appleton and Company | New 
York (ornaments) London (ornaments) 
MCMXXII 

Figure, i, in brackets after last line of text. 

A novelized narrative of the pioneer movement across the great 
western plains, with all its romance and tragedy. This story has 
reached an incalculable public as one of the truly great motion pic- 
tures. 

42 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS 
1837-1920 

The | Rise of Silas Lapham | by | William 
D. Howells | Author of "A Modem In- 
stance/' "A Woman's Reason/' Etc. | 
(publishers' seal) | Boston | Ticknor and 
Company 1 1885 

I note two issues the publishers' lists before title 
are headed in one case "Mr. HowelFs Latest Works" 
and in the other, "Mr. Ho well's Latest Novels/' The 
latter is probably the first issue, indicated by better 
typography, particularly the last line, p. 176. 

By common consent "The Rise of Silas Lapham" is the best ot 
the author's numerous novels. 

A Boy's Town | Described for "Harper's 
Young People" | by | W. D. Howells | 
Author of "The Shadow of a Dream" 
"April Hopes" | "A Hazard of New For- 
tunes" Etc. | Illustrated | New York] 
Harper & Brothers, Franklin Square | 
1890 

The "boy's town" was Hamilton Ohio and "the boy" was young 
Howells. For boy life in America it helps to fill the gap in period 
between Tom Sawyer and Penrod. 



43 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

ELBERT HUBBARD 
1859-1915 

A Message to | Garcia: Being a | Preach- 
ment by (two ornaments) | Elbert Hub- 
bard (ornament) | (publisher's device) I 
Done into a Booklet by the Roy- j crofters 
at the Roycroft Shop, | which is in East 
Aurora, Erie | County, New York, U. S. A. 
(ornament) 

Enclosed in wide ornamental border, which displays 
the word, "Roycroft." Publisher's device in red, 
balance in black. Originally printed in the "Philis- 
tine" for March 1898, and afterwards circulated as a 
separate pamphlet. There were several limited edi- 
tions, the one advertised in the ** Philistine" being one 
thousand signed copies. Hubbard's own methods were 
so involved and his records so incomplete, that it is 
difficult to determine the first printing. The New 
York Central Railroad printed an edition of hundreds 
of thousands for use in advertising but the books of 
the Company show that they first bought one hundred 
copies from Hubbard. 

Apotheosis of the man who carries out an order with a maximum 
of intelligence and directness. 

*' Respectability" by Hubbard is an entertaining and instructive 
essay on the rise and abuse of the frilled shirt and other frills. 



44 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

WASHINGTON IRVING 
1783-1859 

The | Sketch Book | of | Geoffrey Crayon, 
Gent, j (rule) | No. I. | (rule) | (quotation, 
three lines, Burton) j (rule) | New- York: | 
Printed by C. S. Van Winkle, | 101 Green- 
wich-Street. [ (row of eleven dots) \ 1819. 

Issued in wrappers in seven parts with the follow- 
ing points of issue, according to Mr. Edward Turn- 
bull's collation. 

No. I. 1819. Wrapper, "No. I .... Price 75 cents. | (rule) | 
THE SKETCH BOOK. | (rule) | C. S. Van Winkle, Printer. | 101 
Greenwich-street . . . No half-title, and the only half-title in the 
text is for Rip Van Winkle. Title dated 1819. The quotation on 
the title ends on the first line with "of" as in Nos, IV to VII. 
Pp. i to 94 inclusive of title. On back of end wrapper is an ad- 
vertisement that No. II will be published on the ist. of August 
next. Below the imprint and above the date on title-page is a 
row of eleven dots. No. VI has ten dots. Also after No. I on front 
wrapper are four dots, No. V having five dots. 

No. II. Copyright reads 16 July 43*d year; other issues, 26 July 
44th. year. 

No. III. 1819. Same wrappers as above, back of end wrapper 
blank. No preliminary half-title, but half-titles for each sketch 
included in the pagination, as also is the title-page. Quotation on 
title ends on the first line with " spectator." Pp. 171-242. The 
copyright reads, 1 1 Aug. 4jd. year, in other issues 1 1 Aug. 44th. 
year. 

No. IV. 1819. Same wrappers as above, back blank. No half- 
title, others counted in pagination as also is the title-page. Pp. 
2 43-335 inclusive of title. 

45 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

No. V. 1819. Same wrappers as above, back blank. No pre- 
liminary half-title, half-titles in text included in pagination as 
also title-page. Pp. 337-443. After No. V on front wrapper 
five dots appear. 

No. VI. 1820. Brown wrappers as above but differs in the imprint 

on wrapper which reads: No. VI Price 87^" cents | (rule) | 

THE SKETCH BOOK. | (rule) | Published by Haly and Thomas, 
New-York, | and M. Thomas, Philadelphia. The title-page reads 
as in previous parts, New-York | Printed by C. S. Van Winkle, | 
No. 101 Greenwich-street (ten dots) 1820. Advertisement on the 
back mentions "Giovanni Sbogarro" by Percival Gordon and 
Knickerbocker's History of New York. No preliminary half-title, 
others included in the pagination. Pp. 1-120. The following 
changes appear in the later issues of No. VI: P. 33, last line ; is 
changed to P. 51, ninth line begins further to the right. P. 
65 sig. 9 further to the right. There are a few other similar small 
changes. 

No. VII. 1 820. Same wrappers and inside tide as in No. VI. No 
preliminary half-title, others included in the pagination. The 
back cover advertises Knickerbocker's History of New York- and 
states that Ebenezer Irving as the author's agent has purchased 
the remainder and that copies can be obtained from him. Pp. 
1-123 inclusive of title. 

Part one contains the immortal "Rip Van Winkle/' 
part six the "Legend of Sleepy Hollow/' and part five 
those sketches known as "Old Christmas." 

Irving's "Knickerbocker's History of New York" with its combi- 
nation of fact and humor is an interesting book, but belongs in an- 
other collection of different import. 



HELEN HUNT JACKSON 
1831-1885 

Ramona. | A Story. | By Helen Jackson | 
(H. H.), | Author of "Verses," "Bits of 
46 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Travel," "Bits of Travel at Home/ 3 j 

"Bits of Talk About Home Matters/' 

Etc. | (ornament) | Boston: I Roberts 
Brothers. | 1884. 

A view of the Indian as a human being; the tragedy of his sub- 
jugation and ousting by the white race told in the form of a ro- 
mantic novel. 



HENRY JAMES 

1843-1916 

Daisy Miller | a Study | by Henry James, Jr. | 
(rule) | New York | Harper & Brothers, 
Publishers | Franklin Square | 1879 

Issued in wrappers, also in cloth, in the Harper's 
Half-Hour Series. 

The Golden Bowl | by | Henry James | Vol- 
ume I [Volume II] | New York | Charles 
Scribner's Sons | 1904 

Henry James is to me one of the great mysteries of Literature. 
His involved style pleases many greatly and displeases many more. 
And his admirers differ as widely as do Conrad's as to the high spots 
of his writings. One says he wrote nothing of importance before he 
went to live in England, another claims that he wrote nothing of 
significance after he went abroad. The two titles listed above are 
representative of the two periods. 



47 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

THOMAS A. JANVIER 
1849-1913 

The | Aztec Treasure-House | A Romance | 
of | Contemporaneous Antiquity | by | 
Thomas A. Janvier | Illustrated | (pub- 
lishers' seal) | New York | Harper & Broth- 
ers, Franklin Square | 1890 

Ingenious adventure story with a background of picturesque 
American history. 

MARY JOHNSTON 

1870 

To Have and | To Hold | by | Mary John- 
ston | Author of " Prisoners of Hope" | 
With Illustrations by Howard Pyle, E. B. 
Thompson, | A, W. Betts, and Emlen 
McConnell | (publishers* seal) | Boston 
and New York | Houghton, Mifflin and 
Company | The Riverside Press, Cam- 
bridge 1 1900 

Title enclosed in double line border* 250 copies 
with paper label, untrimmed. 

Historical novel interwoven with the celebrated shipment of wives 
for the English colonists. 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

JOYCE KILMER 
1886-1918 

Trees j and | Other Poems 1 by | Joyce Kil- 
mer 1 (ornament) | New York [ George H: 
Doran Company [1914] 

Title enclosed in straight line borders. 

The first issue is in mouse colored boards with gilt 
top and does not have "Printed in the United States " 
on verso of title-page. 

The title poem, "Trees," is the thing. 

CHARLES GODFREY LELAND 
1824-1903 

Hans Breitmann 5 s | Party. | (rule) | With 
Other Ballads. | (rule) j Philadelphia: \ 
T. B. Peterson & Brothers; | 306 Chest- 
nut Street. 

Issued in wrappers. The first issue has "Ringwalt 
& Brown, Prs." in small type on the outside front 
wrapper. 

Humorous poems in German-American dialect. The title poem 
and "Ballad" are the best known. 

It may be mentioned, incidentally, that the Breitmann ballads 
have recently been reprinted in a splendid limited edition, and that 
the great Kipling honored Leland with his "Two Breitmann Bal- 
lads. 

49 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

ALFRED HENRY LEWIS 
1857-1914 

Wolfville | by | Alfred Henry Lewis | (Dan 
Quin) | Illustrated by | Frederic Reming- 
ton | (portrait head) | New York | Frederick 
A, Stokes Company 1 Publishers [1897] 

Dialect stories of Arizona in the Indian-Badman-Cowboy days. 

SINCLAIR LEWIS 
1885 

Main Street | The Story of Carol Kennicott | 
by | Sinclair Lewis | (publishers* seal) | 
New York | Harcourt, Brace and Howe | 
1920 

Many printings before publication. Issued in light, 
medium, and dark blue cloths. The file copy at the 
publishers is in dark blue; I remember seeing an in- 
scribed copy the first week of publication in medium 
blue no doubt inspection of the typography will 
eventually clear this up. 

A satire on the cultural efforts of the small town. The term, 
"Main Street" has passed into the language as meaning "of a small 
town.*' 

Babbitt | by | Sinclair Lewis | Author of 
"Main Street" j (publishers' seal) | New 
50 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

York 1 Harcourt, Brace and Company 
[1922] 

Again a satire, directed at the spiritual lacks of the average busi- 
ness man. 

"Arrowsmith" is another of the satire series, directed at certain 
types of doctors. "Elmer Gantry" is on the hypocritical Evangel- 
ist. 



JACK LONDON 
1874-1916 

The Call | of the Wild | by i Jack London | 
(portrait head of dog) | New York | The 
Macmillan Company | London: Macmillan 
& Co., Ltd. | 1903 | All rights reserved 

Title enclosed in double line border. Top panel 
contains "Illustrated by Philip R. Goodwin and Charles 
Livingston Bull/* Bottom panel contains "Decorated 
by Chas. Edw. Hooper." Decorative background of 
title-page shows glacier scene. Borders, panels, and 
background in blue grey, balance in black. 

A dog story in the Alaskan setting. In the "Call of the Wild" 
the dog goes back to the wolf; and in "White Fang," a later story, 
the wolf is tamed to the dog. 

Before Adam | by | Jack London | Author 
of | "Call of the Wild," "The Sea | Wolf," 
"People of the Abyss," | "White Fang," 



UGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Etc., Etc. | With Numerous Illustrations 
By | Charles Livingston Bull | New York | 
The Macmillan Company | London: Mac- 
millan & Co., Ltd. | 1907 | All rights re- 
served 

The life of prehistoric man so fascinates me that I am compelled 
include this book. 

3hn | Barleycorn | by | Jack London | Au- 
thor of "The Call of the Wild," "The ( 
Abysmal Brute," "Smoke Bellew," | "The 
Night-Born," etc. | Illustrated by | H. T. 
Dunn | (publishers' seal) 1 New York | 
The Century Co. | 1913 

This is London's autobiography needless to say he lived the 
Id scenes depicted in his books. But what makes this book im- 
rtant is the story of alcohol seen by a keen observer, and his per- 
lal struggle with that moot question of today and other days. 

[ENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW 

1807-1882 

rvangeline, | a | Tale of Acadie. | by | Henry 
Wadsworth Longfellow 1 (rule) | Boston: | 
William D. Ticknor & Company. | 1847. 

Tradition has it that in the first edition of this work 
Long," first word p. 61, was printed **Lo^ and that 

52 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

the missing letters were supplied in later editions. 
Newer theories have arisen that the letters fell out 
(the book being printed from type) after the first print- 
ing and the correction to the original was made later. 
Also there is a controversy over the glazed or unglazed 
board in the binding. 

An epic poem based on the forced evacuation of Acadia. 

The | Song of Hiawatha. | by | Henry Wads- 
worth Longfellow. | Boston: j Ticknor and 
Fields, j MDCCCLV. 

The first issue has the word "dove," line 7, p. 96 
which was changed to "dived" in later issues. 

Another epic poem, in this case of Indian life and legends. 

"The Tales of a Wayside Inn"- contains "The Children's Hour" 
and "Paul Revere's Ride." The book entitled "Ballads" has our 
old friend, "The Village Blacksmith." Other well known poems 
are "The Hanging of the Crane" and "The Psalm of Life." 

AMY LOWELL 
1874-1925 

Men, Women | and | Ghosts 1 by | Amy 
Lowell 1 Author of | "A Dome of Many- 
Coloured Glass" | "Sword Blades and 
Poppy Seed" | "Six French Poets" j New 
York | The Macmillan Company | 1916 [ 
All Rights Reserved 
S3 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

"Patterns" included in the above is the poem supposed to give 
the best clue to Miss Lowell's peculiar genius. The method is " free " 
verse and the content is aimed at what makes the late nineteenth 
century New England character tick. 

A longer poem, "East Wind," comprising an entire volume, is 
said to be a supreme instance of "sardonic humor." 

("Patterns" was previously included in an anthology, but I pre- 
fer to present it in its proper setting.) 



JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL 

1819-1891 

The | Biglow Papers, | Edited, | With an In- 
troduction, Notes, Glossary, | And Copious 
Index, | by | Homer Wilbur, A.M., | Pastor 
of the First Church in Jaalam, And (Prospec- 
tive) Member of | Many Literary, Learned 
and Scientific Societies, | (for which see page 
v.) | (quotation two lines, Quarle's Em- 
blems) | (quotation one line, Jac. Car. 
etc.,) | Cambridge: | Published by George 
Nichols. | 1848. 

Title-page follows 12 pages of "press notices" and 
half-title. At the top of the title-page, set off by a 
rule, is the cryptic "Meliboeus-Hipponax." A special 
edition of some dozen copies "for presentation" is said 
not to be the original issue. There is small doubt, how- 
ever, that some of the first copies were bound in boards 
with a paper label, 

54 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Politico-humor in the Yankee dialect of the time. It might be 
considered necessary to include the Biglow Papers 3 Second Series, 
at the time of the Civil War. This latter volume contains among 
other things, that well known poem "The CourtinV 



WILLIAM McFEE 
1881. 

Casuals | of the Sea ( The Voyage of a Soul [ 
by William McFee (two ornaments) \ 
(double rule) | (double rule) | London: 
Martin Seeker | Number Five John Street 
Adelphi MCMXVI 

The first American Edition was printed in England 
with Doubleday Page imprint. 

A sea story only in that some of those who people its pages are 
seafarers and spend some of their time at sea. 

EDWIN MARKHAM 
1852 

The Man (ornaments) ( With the Hoe (orna- 
..ment) | Written after seeing Millet's | 
World-Famous Painting (dotted line) | 
(ornaments) by Edwin Markham | Origi- 
nally published in "The San | Francisco 
Examiner" (ornament) January the | fif- 
55 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE* 

teenth (ornaments) Eighteen hundred and I 
ninety-nine, (ornaments) Now first issued 
in | book form, March thirtieth, Eighteen | 
hundred and ninety-nine, (ornaments) | 
San Francisco, California (ornament) Pub- 
lished | by A. M. Robertson, (ornaments) 

Title enclosed in double line border. Double panel 
lines under "With the Hoe/ 5 "Edwin Markham," and 
"by A. M. Robertson." Double panel lines over 
"Originally published in 'The San.' " 

Ornaments in first, second and fifth lines and deco- 
rative panel below publisher's name are in red, blance 
in black. 

Single poem printed in pamphlet form, inspired by the famous 
Millet painting. The most quoted line is: "Whose was the hand 
that slanted back this brow?" 



EDGAR LEE MASTERS 

1869 

Spoon River | Anthology | by | Edgar Lee 
Masters | New York | The Macmillan Com- 
pany | 1915 | All Rights Reserved 

Free verse characterizations of small town people, disguised as 
epitaphs. Written with understanding and sympathy in the Wil- 
liam Allen White manner as contrasted to the Sinclair Lewis attitude 
of disdain. 

56 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

HERMAN MELVILLE 
1819-1891 

Moby-Dick; | or, j The Whale. | by \ Her- 
man Melville, | Author of | "Typee," 
"Omoo," "Redburn," "Mardi," "White- 
Jacket/ 5 | (waved rule) | New York: | 
Harper & Brothers, Publishers. | London: 
Richard Bentley. 1 1851. 

Some claim the London edition as first issue: I can- 
not confirm this. 

Tale of the sea written in the early nineteenth century, hailed 
rom semi-obscurity in the twentieth century and acclaimed a mas- 
terpiece. The mystic quality of the pursuit differentiates this from 
the conventional adventure story. 

EDNA ST. VINCENT MILLAY 
1892 

Renascence | and | other Poems | by | Edna 
St. Vincent Millay | (publisher's seal) | New 
York | Mitchell Kennerley | MCMXVII 

Of the first edition, seventeen copies were printed 
on vellum, the balance on Glaslan watermarked paper. 

Renascence, one of the prize winning poems in the "Lyric Year," 
1912, still stands as a literary achievement. 

"Lyric Year" is an anthology, so I prefer to present Renascence 
as described above, in its proper setting with other of Miss Millay's 
work, including the notable sonnet, "Bluebeard." 

57 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

DONALD G. MITCHELL 

"IK. MARVEL" 

1822-1908 

Reveries j of | A Bachelor: | or | A Book of 
the Heart. | By Ik. Marvel, ] Author of 
Fresh Gleanings. | (rule) | (quotation, three 
lines, Burton's Anatomy.) [ (rule) | New 
York: | Baker & Scribner. | 1850. 

There seem to be two editions in this year, and the 
one slightly taller, the leaf measuring nearly 7^/2 inches 
tall, seems to have fewer type defects. It comes in 
blue, green, or dark red cloth. 

Why worry about bachelors ? But many people do and here's 
the most celebrated attempt to put down what one of them thinks. 

JOAQUIN MILLER 
1841-1913 

Songs of the Sierras | by | Joaquin Miller* | 
(ornament) | Boston: | Roberts Brothers. [ 
1871. 

Title-page of the American issue, though the English 
edition probably preceded it. 

First Families | of the | Sierras. | (rule) | By 
Joaquin Miller, | Author of "Songs of the 
58 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Sierras/' "Songs of the Sun-Lands/* j 
"The Ship in the Desert/ 5 Etc. \ (rule) | 
Chicago: j Jansen, McClurg & Co. | 1876. 

Poet laureate of the great wooded spaces of the West. A bit 
cruder than Bret Harte, but yet giving breezy and vivid pictures of 
the pioneer epoch. The "First Fam'lies" is a prose effort, different 
enough from Bret Harte's stories to be included here. 

S. WEIR MITCHELL, MIX 
1843-1913 

Hugh Wynne) Free Quaker | Sometime Brevet 
Lieutenant-Colonel on | The Staff of his 
Excellency | General Washington | by I S. 
Weir Mitchell, M.D. | LL.D. Harvard and 
Edinburgh | Vol. I [Vol. II] | (publishers' 
seal) | New York | The Century Co. | 1897 

60 copies on large paper for presentation by the 
author. 

Illustrations in separate portfolio. 

A story of the Revolution, our hero a young officer under Wash- 
ington. 

"The Adventures of Francois" by Mitchell is the story of a lovable 
rogue at the time of the French Revolution, and succeeds without 
a heroine ! 

CLEMENT C. MOORE 

1779-1863 

Poems | by | Clement C. Moore, LL.D. [ 
(rule) | (quotation, one line, Hor.) | (rule) | 
59 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

New York: | Bartlett & Welford, | 7 Astor 
House | (rule) | 1844. 

Containing "A visit from St. Nicholas" better recalled by the 
first line, "'Twas the night before Christmas/ 1 



FRANK NORRIS 
1870-1902 

McTeague | A Story of San Francisco | by 
Frank Norris | Author of "Moran of the 
Lady Letty" | (ornament) | New York | 
Doubleday & McClure Co. j 1899 

Title enclosed in single line border. Single panel 
line under " Author of 'Moran of the Lady Letty* " 
and over "New York/* The last word on page 106 
is "moment." 

A novel with character studies of everyday people who end in a 
tragedy of money-madness. 

The Epic of the Wheat | The Pit | A Story 
of Chicago | by I Frank Norris | (pub- 
lishers* seal) 1 New York | Doubleday, 
Page & Co. | 1903 

Special publishers* presentation edition in grey 
boards with paper label. 

One of a projected trilogy, the last of which was never written. 
"The Octopus** was first, showing the drama of the production of 

60 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

wheat, including the war between the grower and the railroad. " The 
Pit" gives the distribution and speculation in wheat, and "The 
Wolf," to be the last of the series, was not written due to the writer's 
premature death. 

THOMAS NELSON PAGE 

1853-1922 

In Ole Virginia | or | Marse Chan and Other 
Stories | by | Thomas Nelson Page | New 
York | Charles Scribner's Sons | 1887 

Stories of the "Old Dominion," before and during the Civil War. 
This book is not so noted in literary circles as his "Red Rock," a 
novel which might be a historical document on the problems of re- 
construction. 

DAVID GRAHAM PHILLIPS 
1867-1911 

David Graham Phillips I (rule) | Susan 
Lenox | Her Fall and Rise | Volume I [Vol- 
ume II] | (publishers' seal) | With a Por- 
trait | of the Author | D. Appleton and 
Company | New York London [1917 

(i) after last line of text. 

The life story of the love-child who goes through the depths finally 
to become a great actress. Phillips states in his preface that the 
novel is his conception of the common-sense way to write of the 
problems of sex. 

Other titles of Phillips's work which seem powerful are "Old Wives 
for New," "A Grain of Dust," and "The Fashionable Adventures 
of Joshua Craig." 

61 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

EDGAR A. POE 
1809-1849 

Tales | by | Edgar A. Poe. | New York: | 
Wiley and Putnam, 161 Broadway. | 
(rule) | 1845- 

There is no need to introduce the "Gold Bug," "The Fall of the 
House of Usher," and "The Murders in the Rue Morgue." It has 
been urged that the collection include "Tales of the Grotesque and 
Arabesque," 2. volumes, Philadelphia, 1840, on account of the cele- 
brated "Pit and the Pendulum"; but the book named above in- 
cludes by long odds more better-known stories, and if the gruesome 
is desired need one go farther than those mentioned above. 

The Raven and Other Poems. | by | Edgar A, 
Poe. | (waved rule) ( New York and Lon- 
don. | Wiley and Putnam, 161 Broadway 6 
Waterloo Place. | Price, Thirty-one Cents. 

Title enclosed in double line border, inner border 
with curved corners. Above "The Raven and Other 
Poems" there is as follows: (quotation, four lines, 
Address of the American Copy-right Club) | (waved 
rule) | Wiley and Putnam's | Library of American 
Books. | (waved rule | No. VIIL | (waved rule). 

Issued in cloth and wrappers. Some copies have 
stereotypers* imprint on verso of title-page, but I 
cannot state if this is a point of issue. 

Around the curious figure of the raven, Poe has woven man's 
questioning of the eternal mystery of death with its attendant sor- 
row to the living. 

62 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

HOWARD PYLE 

1853-1911 

Men of Iron | by \ Howard Pyle \ Author of | 
"The Wonder Clock" "Pepper and Salt" \ 
"The Rose of Paradise" etc. | Illustrated j 
(publishers' seal) | New York | Harper & 
Brothers, Franklin Square | 1892 

Apparently there are two different editions on two 
different thicknesses of paper but which is first is as 
yet undetermined. There is a probability that the 
thin paper edition measuring one and one sixteenth 
inches across the top is the first issue in view of con- 
temporary inscriptions preceding the date on title- 
page. 

Written as a book for boys, it is an absorbing story of the train- 
ing of a young lad, son of an attainted noble, through youth and 
young manhood with the sole object of removing the taint in trial 
by combat. 

FREDERIC REMINGTON 

1861-1909 

The Way of an Indian | Written and Illus- 
trated | by | Frederic Remington | Author 
of | "Men With the Bark on/ 5 | "Crooked 
Trails," &c. | (publishers' seal) | New York 
| Fox Duffield & Company | 1906 
63 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Red cloth, yellow stamping, Fox Duffield & Co. at 
foot of back-strip. 

Perhaps the only successful attempt to give the psychology of 
the western Indian in his war and love-life. Illustrated by the au- 
thor. 

JAMES WHITCOMB RILEY 

1849-1916 

"The | Old Swimmin'-Hole," ( and | Xeven 
More Poems, ( by | Benj. F. Johnson, of 
Boone. | (rule) | [James Whltcomb Riley.] j 
(rule) | Indianapolis, Ind.: | George C. 
Hitt & Co. | 1883. 

Title entirely in red. Issued in wrappers. 

Poetry of the people at its best. Of course, the locale is Indiana, 
and the subjects are mostly reminiscent of childhood. 



CHARLES G. D. ROBERTS 

1860 

The. Watchers | of. the. Trails j A. Book, 
of. Animal. Life. By | Charles. G. D. Rob- 
erts | Author of | "The Kindred of the 
Wild," "The Heart of | the Ancient Wood," 
"Barbara Ladd," "The | Forge in the | 
Forest," | "Poems," | etc. | (vignette draw- 
ing of moose head with "With Many | 
64 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Illustrations | by | " on right of vignette 
and "Charles j Livingston | Bull j " on 
left of vignette) | L. C. Page & Company | 

MDCCCCIV. . . Boston 

Title enclosed in heavy line border. 

Title, author's name and publishers' name in red, 
balance in black. "Published June, 1904." appears on 
verso of title-page. 

The author is a Canadian but his works were mostly published in 
the United States; he, himself, has spent many years here, and the 
scenes and animals described are common to the northern states 
of the Union. 

I can mention no particular one of this collection of short stories 
as being superior to any in "The Kindred of the Wild" or "Haunters 
of the Silence," but chose the title as characteristic of Major Roberts' 
best work. In my opinion his short sketches of animal life take the 
reader nearer the heart of the wood than any other writer. 



MORGAN ROBERTSON 

1861-1914 

"Where Angels Fear to | Tread" (ornaments) 
and Other | Tales of the Sea (ornaments) | 
By Morgan Robertson | (publishers* seal) | 
Published by the Century Co. | New York 
(ornaments) MDCCCXCIX 

Robertson is not to be characterized as an American Conrad. 
He is a master of sea lore and the short story form in his own right. 

This collection of stories contains "Salvage" and "Primordial," 
among others of special merit. 

65 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

CARL SANDBURG 
1878 

Smoke and Steel | by | Carl Sandburg [ 
Author of "Chicago Poems," | "Corn- 
huskers" | (publishers* seal) | New York | 
Harcourt, Brace and Company | [1920] 

Next the ground poetry, without rhyme, but with rhythm and in- 
terest. 

Similar collections are "Chicago Poems" and " Cornhuskers." 
Sandburg is also known through his prose "Lincoln" and the "Root- 
abaga Stories." 

ALAN SEEGER 
1888-1916 

Poems | by | Alan Seeger | With an Introduc- 
tion | by | William Archer j New York | 
Charles Scribner's Sons | MCMXVI 

Contains the famous poem, "I Have A Rendezvous With Death." 

ERNEST THOMPSON SETON 

"ERNEST SETON THOMPSON" 
1860 

Wild. Animals. , I . . Have. Known |. and. 
200. Drawings. | by | Ernest (ornament) 
66 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Seton (ornament) Thompson J Naturalist. 
to. the. Govern | ment. of. Manitoba. . . 
Author, of. | 'Birds, of. Manitoba' (three 
ornaments) | "Mammals, of. Manitoba/ 
(ornament); | Art. Anatomy, of. Animals. 
| Being the Personal Histories of | Lobo | 
Silverspot | Raggylug | Bingo | The Spring- 
field Fox | the Pacing Mustang | Wully | 
and Redruflf | (animal head) | (rule) j Pub- 
lished, by. Charles. Scribner's. Sons. New. 
York. City. A. D. 1898. 

Hand lettered title-page with sketch in upper left 
of seated figure of man surrounded by various animals 
and birds. 

"And 200 Drawings," "Ernest Seton Thompson" 
and initials of "Personal," "Lobo," "Silverspot," 
"Raggylug," "Bingo," "The" (Springfield Fox), 
"The" (Pacing Mustang), "Wully," "Redruff," and 
"Charles Scribner's Sons" in red; balance in black. 

Later editions carry the added words, last para- 
graph, p. 265, "And the Angel said ' Don't go F " 



Seton is one of our adopted Canadians. The above book made 
and sustains his fame, but his "Trail of the Sandhill Stag" is the 
first great plea for the suppression of the killer instinct and the con- 
servation of animal life. "The Natural History of the Ten Com- 
mandments" is more a scientific treatise than a piece of literature, 
yet is one of the most illuminating short essays I have read. 



6 7 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

UPTON SINCLAIR 
1878 

The Jungle | by | Upton Sinclair | The Jungle 
Publishing Co. | Box 2064, New York [1906] 

"The Jungle" was first issued in a "sustainers' edi- 
tion," presumably delivered to subscribers, with the 
imprint, "Jungle Publishing Co.," on cover and title- 
page. These copies measure i^V inches across the 
top with covers. Later editions are on thinner paper 
including those with the Doubleday, Page and Co. 
imprint on the title-page and back-strip. 

"The Jungle" is the story of the stock-yard district of Chicago. 
What would be called today (1928) "realism" was known in 1906 
as " muck-raking." The book caused a national stir, and it is still 
read as a powerful picture of human tragedy under bad industrial 
conditions. 

"The Brass Check" is an attempt to expose alleged capitalistic 
manipulation of the Press, and "Oil" is the story not so much of 
the physical product as the "financial" gambles attendant thereon. 
Neither book seems to capture popular attention as did "The Jungle. 1 ' 



F. HOPKINSON SMITH 

1838-1915 

Colonel Carter [ of Cartersville | By F Hop- 
kinson Smith | With Illustrations | By 
E W Kemble And | The Author | pub- 
lishers' seal) | Boston and New York | 
68 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Houghton, Mifflin and Company | The 
Riverside Press, Cambridge [ 1891 

First two lines in red. 

Portrait of a "decayed" southern gentleman of most lovable char- 
acter. 

FRANK R. STOCKTON 
1834-1902 

The Lady, or the Tiger ? | and | Other Stories | 
by | Frank R. Stockton ] New York | Charles 
Scribner's Sons | 1884 

Issued both in cloth and wrappers. 

" The Lady or the Tiger ? " is the title story in a collection of twelve. 
The unsolved human dilemma therein described is classic in its drama. 

The Casting Away of | Mrs. Leeks and Mrs. 
Aleshine | by | Frank R. Stockton | New- 
York | The Century Co. [1886] 

Issued both in cloth and wrappers. 

The Dusantes | A Sequel To "The Casting 
Away of Mrs. Leeks [ And Mrs. Aleshine " \ 
by | Frank R. Stockton | New-York | The 
Century Co. [1888] 

Issued both in cloth and wrappers. 

69 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

The dry "Stocktonian" humor is at its best in this epic of ship- 
wreck in the south seas. The Dusantes, while issued separately, is 
properly a sequel to "The Casting Away," etc. 



HARRIET BEECHER STOWE 
1811-1896 

Uncle Tom's Cabin; | or, | Life Among the 
Lowly. | by | Harriet Beecher Stowe. | 
(vignette) | Vol. I [Vol. II] | Boston: | John 
P. Jewett & Company. | Cleveland, Ohio: | 
Jewett, Proctor & Worthington. | 1852. 

Issued both in cloth and wrappers. The first bind- 
ing has an oval design stamp. There are some copies 
In cloth with extra gilt design on covers said to have 
been especially bound for presentation, only a surmise. 
Later issues state the number of thousands on the title- 
page. 

Some collectors accompany these volumes with a 
separate "Key." 

Mrs. Stowe was a prolific writer but nothing seems to have sur- 
vived but this story of negro slave life which had such an amazing 
influence in crystallizing the issues leading to the Civil War. 

"Dred, a Tale of the Great Dismal Swamp" is a story of an escaped 
slave which was published four years later and undoubtedly added 
impetus to the anti-slavery movement. 

These books are of such paramount historical importance that it 
is difficult to evaluate them as literature. 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

BOOTH TARKINGTON 
1869 

The Gentleman | from Indiana | by | Booth 
Tarkington I (ornament) | New York [ 
Doubleday & McClure Co. | 1899 

Page 245, line 16 "so pretty" later corrected to 
"her heart." 

Other corrections follow this. Probably first issued 
in ribbed cloth, as most copies of the later edition ap- 
pear in the mesh cloth binding. 

Politics and love in a growing mid-west town of the pre-Babbitt 
era when moonlight still created glamour. 

Monsieur | Beaucaire | by | Booth | Tarking- 
ton | Illustrated by C. D. Williams | New 
York | McClure, Phillips & Co. | 1900 

Title incorporated in decorative title-page. 
The printers' colophon on page after text measures 
one-half inch. 

An achievement in short story technique. 

Penrod | By Booth | Tarkington | (illustration 
of boy and dog) | Illustrated by | Gordon 
Grant | Garden City New York | Double- 
day, Page & Company | 1914 

7* 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Hand lettered title-page. First issued in mesh- 
cloth, measuring one and one quarter inches across 
the top covers. 

Tom Sawyer and his pals as they would have been thirty years 
later. 

Seventeen | A Tale of Youth and | Summer 
Time and | The Baxter Family [ Especially 
William | by | Booth Tarkington | Illus- 
trated | (publishers* seal) | Harper & Broth- 
ers Publishers | New York and London 
[1916] 

B-Q at foot of copyright page. 

Puppy love at the age indicated by the title, told with insight and 
humor,, and accompanied by all the scenery of parents, chums and 
ice-cream sodas in the pre-war small town of the midwest. 



HENRY D. THOREAU 

1817-1862 

Walden; | or, | Life in the Woods. | By Henry 
D. Thoreau, | Author of "A Week On 
The Concord and Merrimack Rivers/* | 
(vignette) | (quotation, two lines, page 
92-) 1 Boston: | Ticknor and Fields. | 

MDCCCLIV. 

72 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

The first issue is supposed to have April advertise- 
ments at the end. A copy has been noted with March 
advertisements and many copies with May advertise- 
ments. Whether or not these represent separate print- 
ings has not yet been settled. 

This book is listed as being published in September. 
How come, then, the April ads. in some copies, March 
ads. seen in one copy, and other ads. ranging to October ? 
Did the publishers run out of ads. of the current month 
and put in earlier ones from stock, or vice versa ? 

A cry for simplicity. Two years in a cabin on Walden Pond did 
not offer the moving targets of his river trip, but they did emphasize 
to Thoreau the futility of much feverish human activity. 

A Week | on the | Concord and Merrimack 
Rivers. | (rule) | by | Henry D. Thoreau. j 
(rule) | Boston and Cambridge: | James 
Munroe and Company. | New York : George 
P. Putnam. Philadelphia: Lindsay | And 
Blackiston. London: John Chapman. | 
1849. 

Three lines on page 396 dropped by printer. 

This seven day boat voyage on peaceful New England waters 
could not have been highly adventurous provisions of potatoes and 
melons, nothing but water to drink. Thoreau uses it as a background 
of nature study, human study, reflections on history, and philosophic 
observations, all blended together with charm and even power. 



73 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

HENRY VAN DYKE 
1852 

(ornament) The First | Christmas- | Tree 
(ornaments) j by (ornament) Henry I Van 
Dyke | (ornament) Illustra- I Ted by 
How- | Ard Pyle (ornament) | Charles 
Scribner's Sons \ New York (ornament) 
MDCCCXCVII 

Title incorporated in decorative design. Lettering 
in red with exception of publishers' name and "New 
York," balance in black. 

A stirring story of the early Christian struggle against the pagan 
practice of human sacrifice in ancient Germany. 

The Ruling Passion | Tales of Nature and | 
Human Nature | by | Henry Van Dyke | 
With Illustrations j by W. Appleton Clark | 
(ornament) | New York I Charles Scrib- 
ner's Sons | MDCCCCI 

First, fifth, and eighth lines in red, balance in black. 
Limited to 500 numbered copies signed by the au- 
thor. 

Short stories of French-Canada, led by "A Lover of Music" and 
closing with "The Keeper of the Light.** 

74 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

HENDRIK VAN LOON 
1882 

The Story of 1 Mankind J by | Hendrik Van 
Loon | Boni and Liveright [1921 

Title enclosed in pictorial border of symbolic intent. 

World history treated as the comprehensive view of the upward 
struggle of man, not merely the lists of leaders and dates of events. 
It is inevitable to compare this work with the parallel study by H. G. 
Wells, but I consider that Mr. Van Loon has given his work an in- 
dividual merit. 

LEW. WALLACE 

1827-1905 

Ben-Hur | A Tale of the Christ | by | Lew. 
Wallace | Author of "The Fair God" | 
(quotation, two lines, Count de Gabalis) | 
New York | Harper & Brothers, Franklin 
Square | 1880 

The first binding is light blue with flower design. 

The short dedication "To The Wife of My Youth," 
commonly supposed to designate the first issue ap- 
pears also in some later issues. 

The subtitle, "A Tale of the Christ/' would read more correctly 
A Tale of Early Christians. "Ben-Hur" still reaches its hundreds 
of thousands from stage, screen, and printed page. 

75 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

The Fair God; [ or, 1 The Last of the 'Tzins. [ 
A Tale of the Conquest of Mexico. | by I 
Lew. Wallace, j (quotation, four lines) | 
(publishers 5 monogram) | Boston: j James 
R. Osgood and Company, j Late Ticknor 
& Fields, and Fields, Osgood, & Co. | 1873. 

Overshadowed by "Ben-Hur" but nevertheless a mighty ab- 
sorbing yarn of an interesting period on our continent. 



EDWARD NOYES WESTCOTT 
1847-1898 

David Harum j A Story of American Life j 
by I Edward Noyes Westcott | (publishers' 
seal) | New York | D. Appleton and Com- 
pany | 1898 

Wit and wisdom of the kindly horse trader in a midwest town. 

EDITH WHARTON 

1862 

Ethan Frome \ by j Edith Wharton I New 
York | Charles Scribner's Sons | MCMXI 

Second, fourth, and sixth lines in black, balance in 
red. 

In the first issue the word, " wearily," last line, 
page 135 is perfect, but is broken in later issues. This 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

word Is unbroken in copies both with and without the 
gilt top and I can state no established preference on 
that point. 

The eternal triangle in frustration with a background of New 
England character and climate. 



STEWART EDWARD WHITE 



Gold | by | Stewart | Edward | White | Illus- 
trated by | Thomas Fogarty | Garden 
City, New York | Doubleday, Page & Co. | 

1913 

Title incorporated in full page pictorial design, en- 
closed in single line border. 

The | Gray Dawn | by | Stewart | Edward | 
White | Illustrated by | Thomas Fogarty | 
Garden City, New York | Doubleday Page 

& Co | [1915] 

Title incorporated in full page pictorial design. 

The first issue is in dark grey cloth. Later issues 
in lighter cloth are distinguished by imperfect typog- 
graphy particularly noticeable on page 77. 

The | Rose Dawn | by j Stewart Edward 
White | (publishers' seal) | Garden City 

77 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

New York | Doubleday, Page & Com- 
pany ~| 1920 

Title enclosed in single line borders. Publishers' 
seal and inner line border in red, balance in black. 

These three books combine to form a " California Trilogy." 

"Gold" is concerned with the 1849 era > naturally; "The Gray 
Dawn" carries on through the struggle to control the excesses and 
lawlessness of the gold period, in a word, the story of the vigilantes. 

"The Rose Dawn*' represents the final phase, the widespread agri- 
cultural development of the state. The characters of these novels 
are not related. 

"The Blazed Trail," regarded as one of White's outstanding books, 
is a tale of the timber-cruisers of the northwest. 



WILLIAM ALLEN WRITE 
1868 

The Court of ( Boyville I by [ William Alien 
White | Author of the Real Issue, Etc. \ 
(publishers' seal) | New York | Doubleday 
& McClure Co. I 1899 

A copy has been observed uncut, but that is proba- 
bly a "freak." 

A collection of short stories of boy and girl life in the small town 
(Emporia, Kansas) with a cast of characters including "Piggy Pen- 
nington" and his "Heart's Desire." Unfortunately what should be 
the initial sketch is in another book of White's sketches, "The Real 
Issue.*' 

In Our Town | by | William Allen White | 
(publishers' seal) | Illustrations by F. R. 

78 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Gruger and W. Glackens | (rule) | New 
York | McClure, Phillips & Co. | MCMVI 

"Our Town*' is, of course, Emporia, Kansas again. The book 
recites the current of life which streams by and through the small 
town newspaper office, the stories they print, and the stories they 
cannot print. 

WALT WHITMAN 
1819-1892 

Leaves | of j Grass | (rule) j Brooklyn, New 
York: | 1855. 

The printing of "Leaves of Grass" was by no great 
publishing house with methods, records, etc. Copies 
were distributed a few at a time, some with paper 
wrappers, some bound in cloth. Of the cloth copies, 
some have certain gilt lines and others do not. It is 
surmised only that the absence of the gilt meant a sav- 
ing in cost of those bound up later. Still other copies 
have advertisements claimed to make them later issues. 
Care must be taken to observe if these advertisements 
have been removed in copies purporting to be first. 

Introductory poem (later "Songs of Myself") in this volume of 
"free verse" is said to contain the main elements of Whitman phi- 
losophy. 

JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER 

1807-1892 

Snow-Bound. | A Winter Idyl | by | John 
Greenleaf Whittier. | (vignette illustra- 
79 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

tion) | Boston: | TIcknor and Fields, j 
1866. 

The last page of the text is numbered at the foot, 
52, in the first issue. There were also a few copies 
specially bound for presentation. 

An epic in small. Portraits in stately verse of a New England 
family group about the farm fireside of a winter's evening. 

Other celebrated Whittier poems are "Skipper Ireson's Ride," 
"The Barefoot Boy," and "Maud Muller," contained in "Home 
Ballads/' "The Panorama," and "In War Time," respectively. 



HARRY LEON WILSON 

1867 

Bunker Bean *| by | Harry Leon Wilson | 
Author of I "The Spenders/' "The Lions 
of the Lord," | "The Boss of Little Ar- 
cady," Etc. I (publishers* seal) | Illustrated 
by F. R. Gruger | Garden City New York | 
Doubleday, Page & Company [1913 

The story of the young man who pulled himself up in life and 
love by his bootstraps. 

"Ruggles of Red Gap" is another amusing book by the same 
author with its unforgettable "You can push me just so far.** 

WOODROW WILSON 

1856-1924 

When a Man | Comes to Himself | Woodrow 
Wilson | Ph.D., Litt.D., LL.D. | President 

80 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

of the United States | (publishers' seal) 1 
Harper & Brothers | New York and Lon- 
don | M.C.M.X.V 

B.P. at foot of copyright page. 

A short essay written with power and beauty of language. 
"On Being Human" New York, 1916, is properly a companion 
essay. 

OWEN WISTER 
1860 

The Virginian | A Horseman of the Plains | 
by | Owen Wister | Author of "Red Men 
and White/' "Lin McLean" \ "U. S. Grant: 
a Biography/' Etc., Etc. | With Illustra- 
tions by Arthur I. Keller | New York | The 
Macmillan Company | London: Macmiilan 
& Co., Ltd. | 1902 | All rights reserved 

A novel of the human problems in the cowboy west with the cow- 
puncher from Virginia in conflict with the moral standards of the 
young school-marm from Vermont. 



8l 



PART II 

By the arbitrary division of the collection into 
first and second groups I intend nothing of fi- 
nality. All literary permanence is debatable, so 
perhaps there is a feeling in my mind that the titles 
in this group are a bit more debatable than those of 
the first group. No doubt time will move some of 
these hesitant choices proudly up to the top of the 
list: others will disappear entirely. 



GERTRUDE ATHERTON 
1857 

The Conqueror [ Being the True and Ro- 
mantic | Story of | Alexander Hamilton | 
by 1 Gertrude Franklin Atherton | (quota- 
tion, four lines from Talleyrand, Etudes 
sur la Republique) | New York | The Mao 
millan Company | London: Macrnillan & 
Co., Ltd. | 1902 | All rights reserved 

The life of Alexander Hamilton 5 fictionized. 

RAY STANNARD BAKER 
"DAVID GRAYSON" 

1870 

Adventures | In Contentment I by [ David 
Grayson | Illustrated by | Thomas Fogarty | 
(vignette) | New York | Doubleday, Page 
& Company | 1907 

Widely read essays of the simple life. 
85 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

JOHN KENDRICK BANGS 
1862-1922 

The Water Ghost | and Others | by | John 
Kendrick Bangs | Author of "Coffee and 
Repartee" | Illustrated [ (publishers' seal) [ 
New York I Harper & Brothers Publishers | 
1894 

Very clever burlesque ghost stories. 

A House-Boat on the Styx \ Being Some Ac- 
count of | The Divers Doings of j The As- 
sociated Shades | by | John Kendrick Bangs | 
Illustrated I (publishers* seal) | New York 
and London | Harper & Brothers Pub- 
lishers I 1898 

Cartoon concept of the future life. 

REX BEACH 

1877 

The Spoilers | by | Rex E. Beach | Illustrated 
by | Clarence . Underwood | (publishers' 
seal) | New York and London | Harper & 
Brothers Publishers | MCMVI 
86 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Title enclosed in single line borders. Panel line 
under title. 

An Alaskan tale woven around the struggle for mastery between 
the prospector and capital, otherwise known as "big business." 
Beach also wrote "The Iron Trail," a similar struggle over the Alas- 
kan railroads, and "The Barrier," a story of the battle for Uncle 
Sam's great wealth in timber lands. 



THOMAS BEER 

1889 

The Mauve Decade | American Life | At 
the End of the Nineteenth Century | by | 
Thomas Beer | (quotation, two lines) | 
(publishers' seal) | Alfred. A. Knopf. New 

York I MCMXXVI 

Title enclosed in single line borders with decorative 
curved lines at inside corners. 

165 numbered copies signed by the author. 

Our Victorian age held up to horrid laughter. As a master of a 
unique pictorial style, and as understanding the mind and ways and 
talk of the younger generation, Beer's great book is yet to come or 
might even now be put together from certain short stories that have 
appeared in print. 

JAMES BOYD 

1888 

Drums | by | James Boyd | (ornament) | 
Charles Scribner's Sons | New York. Lon- 
don | 1925 

87 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

First and fourth, fifth and sixth lines enclosed in 
panel lines. The first issue measures one and five- 
eighths inches across the covers. Later editions are 
slightly condensed in form. 

A novel of the Revolution by one of the newer writers. 

DONN BYRNE 
1889-1928 

Messer | Marco Polo | by | Donn Byrne | 
Illustrated | by C. B. Falls I (publishers' 
seal) | New York | The Century Co. | 1921 

Title enclosed in single line borders. 

First edition in dispute. A possible clue is that the 
dust jackets of the first edition do not mention the 
number of printings. In later editions the decorative 
punctuation mark of the period is filled in or worn away 
instead of showing a small period in a square. 

Clever vivifying in novelette form of the life of the great explorer. 



BLISS CARMAN 
1861 

Low Tide on Grand Pre : | A Book of Lyrics : 
by | Bliss Carman | (ornament) | Charles 
L. Webster and Company | Publishers New 
York MDCCCXCIII 

88 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Carman is an adopted Canadian and Is noted rather as a master 
of high class verse than famous for any single poem. 



ROBERT W. CHAMBERS 

1865 

lole | by | Robert W. Chambers | D. Appleton 
& Co. | New York MDCCCCV 

Hand-drawn title-page with interwoven butterfly and 
flower decoration. 

Short stories of lonely young men without social contacts in the 
great city who escaped from their loneliness in a series of then un- 
conventional adventures. Other Chambers books cited are "The 
King in Yellow," "Cardigan," and "The Maid at Arms." 



IRVIN S. COBB 

1876 

Old Judge Priest | by | Irvin S. Cobb [ Au- 
thor of "Back Home," "Paths of Glory/' | 
Etc. I (publishers' seal) | New York | George 
H. Doran Company [1916] 

Title enclosed in single line border. 

Intimate story of Kentucky in the horse racing, bourbon making 
prime, by one who was born there and called his characters by their 
front names. 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

RICHARD HARDING DAVIS 
1864-1916 

Soldiers of Fortune j by | Richard Harding 
Davis | With Illustrations by \ C D. Gib- 
son | New York j Charles Scribner's Sons ( 
1897 

A novel of South American politics with a North American hero. 
Romantic ? Oh my yes ! And does the fine young Engineer (civil) 
get the rich boss's daughter after saving everybody out of a South- 
American-Revolution mess ? He does. 

And how the girls and boys used to read it, with their Rupert of 
Hentzau and their Graustark 1 

In The Fog | by | Richard Harding Davis | 
Illustrated by | Thomas Mitchell Peirce | 
& F. D. Steele | (publisher's seal) | New 
York | R. H. Russell \ MCMI , 

Title enclosed in double rule. 

The Fog is that of London, and the story is in the first flight of 
the detective variety. 

For a complete estimate of Davis, one should also take a volume 
of his short stories, such as "Van Bibber," or "Gallagher:" or that 
last one, "The Deserter." Davis lived a full life as reporter, war 
correspondent and adventurer; and his books will be as valuable a 
record of that period as Owen Wister's books of the Cowboy. 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

PAUL LAWRENCE DUNBAR 
1872-1906 

Majors and Minors: | (double rule) \ (orna- 
ments) | (ornaments) Poems (ornaments) | 
by | Paul Lawrence Dunbar. [Toledo, 
Ohio] [1895] 

A Poet of Color before Poets of Color became fashionable. 
These poems are lyric, not jazz. Mentionable titles are "When 
Malindy Sings," "Ere Sleep Comes Down," "We Wear the Mask." 



JOHN ERSKINE 

1879 

The | Private Life of | Helen of Troy | by | 
John Erskine | (ornament) | Indianapolis | 
The Bobbs-Merrill Company | Publishers 

[1925] 

Above and below are rules and ornaments in orange, 
as is the ornament after the author's name; balance in 
black. 

A satire on ourselves in the guise of a laugh at ancient history. 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

EDNA FERBER 
1887 

So Big | by j Edna Ferber | (publishers' seal) J 
Garden City New York | Doubleday, Page 
& Company | 1924 

Title enclosed in single line borders. Outside line 
and ornament in red, balance in black. 
First edition so states on copyright page. 

The ugly duckling who turns out to be the swan is the mother 
the son starts as the swan and turns out to be the ugly duckling 
in the artistic and spiritual sense. 

It might be said here that Miss Ferber created the character of 
Emma McChesney, perhaps the first great portrayal of the Amer- 
ican girl "in trade." 

WALDO FRANK 



Waldo Frank j City Block 1 (ornament) | 
1922 | Published by Waldo Frank Darien 
Conn. 

Hand lettered title-page. 
Chicago vignettes by a realistic observer. 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

ZONA GALE 
1874 

Miss Lulu Bett | by | Zona Gale | Author of 
"Friendship Village," "Friendship Village 
Love | Stories," "The Loves of Pelleas and 
Ettare," "Birth," Etc. | (publishers' seal) | 
D. Appleton and Company [ New York 
London | 1920 

Title enclosed in double line border. 

The struggle for escape of the suppressed relative who is useful 
with the cooking and housework. 

ARCHIBALD CLAVERING GUNTER 
1847-1907 

Mr. Barnes of New York | A Novel | by | 
Archibald Clavering Gunter | Author of the 
Plays 1 "Prince Karl," "The Deacon's 
Daughter," | "Fresh, The American," 
"Two Nights | In Rome," Etc., Etc. | 
" (rule) | New York | Deshler Welch & Com- 
pany | 1887 

Issued in wrappers and cloth. 
93 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Mr. Potter of Texas | A Novel | by Archibald 
Clavering Gunter | Author of | "Mr. Barnes 
of New York" | (rule) | New York [ The 
Home Publishing Company [ 7 East Four- 
teenth Street | 1888 

Issued in wrappers and cloth. 

Thrillers of our fathers: permitted grudgingly in the front room, 
when the "Nick Carters" had to be read behind the barn. They 
may be known to the future as literature or as literary curiosities. 

JOHN HABBERTON 

1842-1921 

Helen's Babies. | With | Some Account of 
Their Ways Innocent, Crafty, | Angelic, 
Impish, Witching, And Repulsive. | Also, | 
A Partial Record of Their Actions During 
Ten Days | of Their Existence. | by | Their 
Latest Victim. | (ornament) | Loring, Pub- 
lisher, | Cor. Bromfield & Washington 
Streets, | Boston. [1876] 

Issued both in cloth and wrappers. It is probable 
that the original issue contained but one leaf of adver- 
tisements at the back. Later issues have typographical 
defects, notably p. 13, 1. n. 

Antics of Budge and Toddie who " wanted to see the wheels go 
round." Side-splitting for our fathers and still amusing. 

94 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

BEN HECHT 
1893 

Erik Dora | by j Ben Hecht | (ornament) j 
G. P. Putnam's Sons [ New York and Lon- 
don | The Knickerbocker Press | 1921 

Title enclosed in double line box border. 
The first edition is probably the one with cover 
lettering in bright yellow. 

Tale of a man with several women. Without a moral unless it 
be that such a man always desires the lass he left behind him when 
it is too late ! 

Hecht is also the author of "A Thousand and One Afternoons in 
Chicago," vignettes of city life as seen by the observing reporter. 
In his attempt to be bizarre he comes perilously near to being a "peep- 
ing Tom." 



E. W. HOWE 

1854 

The | Story of a Country Town. | (rule) | 
By E. W. Howe. | (rule) | Illustrated from 
Original Designs by W. L. Wells. | (rule) | 
Atchison, Kas.: j Howe & Co. | 1883. 

A true picture drawn by one of the succession of artists, including 
Mark Twain, Eggleston, Howells, Tarkington, and William Allen 
White, before the small town had a rotary club and a movie theatre 
and a Sinclair Lewis to spoof it. 

95 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

JAMES GIBBONS HUNEKER 
1860-1921 

Steeplejack | by [ James Gibbons Huneker ( 
(quotation, single line, Walt Whitman) | 
(ornament) | Volume I [Volume II] | New 
York ( Charles Scribner's Sons \ 1920 

A biography of an observer of "high life" from the vantage point 
of a newspaper critic; he did not create, but he saw. 
"Painted Veils" is similar material in a freer vein. 

FANNIE HURST 

(MRS. JACQUES L. DANIELSON) 

1889 

Lummox | by ( Fannie Hurst | (publisher's 
seal) j New York | Harper & Brothers I 
MCMXXIII 

Special edition, 250 copies, signed. 

Story of East Side New York in which the strong-charactered in- 
dividual escapes from that smothering environment out into Amer- 
ica. Told in the modern manner. 

"A President is Born" is also mentioned as a book with interest. 

WILL JAMES 

1892 

Smoky ( The Cowhorse | by | Will James ( 
(ornamental illustration of a horse) | 
96 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Charles Scribner's Sons | New York (orna- 
ments) London | 1926 

The companionship of the man and his horse in the great solitudes 
sublimated to an epic. 

JAMES OTIS KALER 
(JAMES OTIS) 

1848-1912 

Toby Tyler | or 1 Ten Weeks With a Circus | 
by 1 James Otis | Illustrated | New York | 
Harper & Brothers, Franklin Square \ 1881 

No boy ever lived in America who did not have the dream which 
Toby realized and which hundreds of thousands read with envy. 

BEN KING 

1857-1894 

Ben King's Verse | Edited by Nixon Water- 
man 1 With Introduction by John Mo 
Govern, and | Biography by Opie Read [ 
Drawings Contributed by Chas. A. Gray, 
W.'W. Denslow, H. G. Maratta, | Ray 
Brown, F. Holmes, J. T. McCutcheon, 
Horace Taylor, | Wm. Schmedtgen, T. E. 
Powers, and | Harry O. Landers j Published 
by | The Press Club of Chicago | 1894 
97 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Prince of humorous verse author of the most gorgeous parody 
If I should Die To Night," also "The Pessimist" who laments, 
( Nowhere to go but out, nowhere to come but back." 



JOE LINCOLN 
1870 

Cape Cod Ballads I And Other Verse | by 
Joe Lincoln | (Joseph Crosby Lincoln) | 
With Drawings by Edward W. Kemble ( 
(publisher's ornament) | Albert Brandt: 
Publisher | Trenton, New Jersey | 1902 

That curious animal, the Cape Cod Native, depicted in his lair, 
and in rhyme. Joe has also depicted this fellow in prose, but I haven't 
yet determined which tide should be selected as distinctive. 

CHARLES MAJOR 

1856-1913 

When Knighthood Was | In Flower | or | The 
Love Story of | Charles Brandon and Mary 
Tudor 1 The King's Sister, And Happening 
in the Reign of | His August Majesty, King 
Henry VIII | Rewritten and Rendered into 
Modern English from | Sir Edwin Casko- 
den's Memoir ] by Edwin Caskoden | In- 
dianapolis and Kansas City | The Bowen- 
Merrill Company | MDCCCXCVIII 
98 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

First two lines and publishers' name in red, balance 
in black. 

Picturing what a heluva time a man has who falls in love with the 
King's sister whose marriage is an affair of state, not of the heart. 

Millions of readers seem to have been interested in how he got 
Ms gal in the end. 

MARGARET MARSHALL 

"MARSHALL SAUNDERS" 

1861 

Beautiful Joe | An Autobiography j By Mar- 
shall Saunders | Author of "My Spanish 
Sailor" j With an Introduction | by 1 Heze- 
kiah Butterworth | Of Youth's Compan- 
ion 1 (vignette) | Philadelphia j Charles EL 
Banes | 1420 Chestnut Street 1894 

The "Black Beauty" of the dog world. 

GEORGE BARR McCUTCHEON 

1866-1928 

Graustark | The Story of a Love | Behind a 
Throne | by | George Barr McCutcheon | 
(publishers' ornament) | Herbert S. Stone 
and Company | Eldridge Court, Chicago | 
MDCCCCI 



99 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Title enclosed in double line border with panel lines 
under first, third, fifth lines and over publishers* name. 
Publishers' ornament in red, balance in black. 

In the first issue, page 150, line 6, "Noble's" ap- 
pears instead of "Lorry's" as in the later issues. 

First and greatest of those Imaginary small kingdom romances. 



EL L. MENCKEN 
1880 

In Defense | of Women | by H. L. Mencken | 
Ppilip Goodman: New York : 1918 

Note the misprint on title-page, Ppilip for Philip. 

Giving representation to our most sanguinary critic the tide 
captivates me because our women no longer need defending a series 
of clever essays in small. 

CHRISTOPHER MORLEY 

1890 

Parnassus On Wheels | by | Christopher Mor- 
ley | (publishers* ornament) J Garden City 
New York | Doubleday, Page & Company 
I 1917 

Title enclosed in single border. 
Page 4, line 8, has long space between "y" 
"ears." 

100 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Where the | Blue Begins | by | Christopher 
Morley | (publishers* ornament) [ (quota- 
tion, four lines, William Blake) | Garden 
City New York | Doubleday, Page & Com- 
pany | 1922 

Title enclosed in double line borders. Inside border 
and publishers' ornament in red, balance in black. 

First edition so states on copyright page. It is said 
also tl\at there were a few advance copies sent out in 
wrappers. 

Translations | from the | Chinese j by | Chris- 
topher Morley | New (publishers' mono- 
gram) York | George tL Doran Company 
[1922] 

For incisive cleverness the little poetic satires of "Translations" 
etc., are nearest hits, although some are over topical. "Where the 
Blue Begins" is a whimsical tale of a humanized dog, and "Parnassus 
on Wheels" is a nice yarn of a travelling book-store. 

GEORGE POPE MORRIS 

1802-1864 

The | Deserted Bride; | and | other Poems.) by 
George P. Morris. | New-York: [ Adlard & 
Saunders, Broadway. 1 MDCCCXXXVIIL 

Contains "The Oak," better known by the first line, "Woodman, 
spare that tree!" 

101 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

EUGENE O'NEILL 

1888 

The Hairy Ape j Anna Christie | The First 
Man | by | Eugene O'Neill | Boni and 
Liveright j Publishers New York [1922] 

O'Neill is at this writing our most esteemed and successful play- 
wright. The difficulty in rating plays with other literature seems 
to be that most people who appreciate a play as spoken cannot fol- 
low it as written. Shakespeare, Shaw, and others have survived 
this handicap. But in rating O'Neill for the future one must guess 
whether he will surmount that hurdle. 

I submit the book above as containing typical work and have 
been assured that his latest play, " Strange Interlude," is quite read- 
able. 

ALICE HEGAN [RICE] 

1870 

Mrs. Wiggs of the I Cabbage Patch | by | 
Alice Caldwell Hegan | (illustration) | Pub- 
lished by the Century Co. | New York . . 
MCMI 

"The Cabbage Patch" was a slang name for the "poor-quarter" 
in which lived the "Widdy-lady" with great troubles and great 
optimism. 

ELIZABETH MADOX ROBERTS 

1894 

The Time of Man | A Novel | Elizabeth Madox 
Roberts | (publishers' mark) | New York | 
The Viking Press | MCMXXVI 

102 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Title enclosed in double line border. 

Life and labor in the Kentucky hill country. In spite of the title 
it is the story of Ellen, who starts to work in a tobacco field at a 
tender age, marries, raises a family, and we leave her following her 
man to another place to settle down to more labor. The character 
bits are finely done, and a spiritual fineness depicted in this woman 
of the "poor whites.'* 

EDWIN ARLINGTON ROBINSON 

1869 

The Man Against the Sky | A Book of Poems j 
by | Edwin Arlington Robinson | New York | 
The Macmillan Company 1 1916 I All Rights 
Reserved 

The tide poem is said to represent the best of Robinson's genius. 
In addition to his many collections of short verse, he is the author 
of a long epic, "Tristram," which has admirers. 

JOHN JEROME ROONEY 

1866 

An | American Anthology | 1787-1900 | Selec- 
tions Illustrating the Editor's Critical | Re- 
view of American Poetry in the | Nineteenth 
Century | Edited by | Edmund Clarence 
Stedman | Author of " Poets of America/* 
"Victorian Poets/' Etc. | and Editor of 
"A Victorian Anthology " \ In Two Vol- 
umes | Vol. II | (publishers' seal) | Cam- 
103 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

bridge | Printed at the Riverside Press | 
1900 

Large paper limited edition, with paper label 

The first book appearance for that rallying song of the Spanish- 
American War, "The Men Behind the Guns." 

ROBERT W. SERVICE 
1876 

Songs of a Sourdough | by | Robert W. Ser- 
vice | (ornament) \ Toronto: \ William 
Briggs | 1907 

Contains that riotous epic of Alaska, "The Shooting of Dan 
McGrew." 

HENRY A. SHUTE 
1856 

The | Real Diary | of a | Real Boy | (orna- 
ment) | by | Henry A. Shute | The Everett 
Press] Boston, Mass., Mcmii 

Title enclosed in double line border. Double panel 
lines under fourth and sixth lines. 

Boy tricks told in boy slang and still amusing to the grown-up 
boys. 

104 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

VANCE THOMPSON 
1863-1925 

The Carnival | of Destiny j by | Vance Thomp- 
son | Author of "Drink and Be Sober/' 
"Eat and Grow j Thin," "The Ego Book/' 
Etc. | (publishers' mark) | New York | 
Moffat, Yard & Company | 1916 

A novel of transmigration, beginning in prehistoric days and end- 
ing with Edgar Allan Poe. The crux of each episode is the frustra- 
tion of the male character in his love affair by some more physically 
powerful brute. 

GLENWAY WESTCOTT 

1901 

The I Grandmothers | A Family Portrait | 
by | Glenway Westcott | (publisher's seal) | 
You do not see me as I once was. ] Chil- 
dren, get out the photographs. | My 
Grandmother | Publishers | Harper & 
Brothers | New York and London | 1927 

Limited to 250 signed copies, paper label. 
Human portraits, powerfully, sympathetically done. 



105 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

JAMES McNEILL WHISTLER 

1834-1903 

The Gentle Art of ] Making Enemies: | 
Edited by Sheridan Ford | New York | 
Frederick Stokes & Brother j (rule) | 1890 

Issued in wrappers. Printed in Ghent, with vary- 
ing title-pages, New York and Paris* Other things 
being identical it seems that the volume carrying the 
imprint of the author's native land is preferred. There 
is a long story about a previous edition which Whistler 
suppressed, leaving only one personal copy unde- 
stroyed. 

This and That by and about one of the world's picturesque geni- 
uses. Trained at West Point to be a soldier, Whistler turned to 
the field of art and literature to fight his enemies with the rapiers 
of brush and pen. 

KATE DOUGLAS WIGGIN 

1856-1923 

Rebecca [ of Sunnybrook | Farm | by \ Kate 
Douglas Wiggin | Boston and New York | 
Houghton, Mifflin and Company | The 
Riverside Press, Cambridge | 1903 

Title enclosed in single line border with inner rec- 
tangles, top rectangle with pictorial design of farm- 
house above first line and including fifth, balance in 
lower rectangle. Borders and illustration in green, 
balance in black. 
A "Little Woman" of the nineties. 

106 



PART III 

NOTES AND COMMENTS 

Where are the manuscripts of these American mas- 
terpieces ? I should be glad to have the owner of any 
of them write to me as certificate of the pleasing knowl- 
edge of their survival. 

The American and English manuscripts of "Tom 
Sawyer'* are in the hands of New York collectors. 
"Puddn'head Wilson" and "The Autocrat of the 
Breakfast Table" are in the Morgan Library. I think 
I saw the manuscript of "Hadleyburg" on Robert 
Collier's library table. Where are "Uncle Remus," 
the "Last of the Mohicans/' etc. ? 

Dr. Rosenbach predicts the greatest value for Amer- 
ican manuscripts in the writings of Herman Melville 
and Eugene O'Neill. I respect the Doctor's sage judg- 
ment but it seems to me that "The One Hoss Shay," 
"The Raven," "The Red Badge of Courage," "Snow- 
Bound," "The Last of the Mohicans," "The Sketch- 
book," "Ben-Hur," "Tom Sawyer," among others, 
would all step ahead of his choices. Melville and 
O'Neill have created no characters that live in the 
popular mind, and O'Neill rests under the handicap of 
the playwright, lack of readability, escaped by Shake- 
speare, perhaps Shaw and Ibsen. 



I quote without permission from Harry Hansen's 
column in the New York World part of a review of 

107 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Maxwell Bodenhelm's "Georgia May" which gives an 
interesting side-light on certain aspects of literature. 

"When an able writer uses all his gifts to depict dirt and squalor 
the reader again asks the immemorial question: 'Why waste time 
on such characters? 1 For ages authors have answered according 
to their insight; some have made propaganda for the downtrodden 
by painting their suffering; others have plied naturalism as a reac- 
tion to romanticism; the Victorians used such women for contrast 
and as horrible examples of the wages of sin; more recently the theory 
that the artist may write about anything he pleases has opened 
windows on garbage heaps, ash dumps and abattoirs. Every man 
to his taste. 

"But Mr. Bodenheim's preoccupation with these themes arises 
partly out of the sincerity of an artist who writes about a life he had 
studied at first hand, and partly because he sees in these distorted, 
unlovely people of the underworld a protest against the shams and 
hypocrisies of the self-confessed respectable. So he contemplates 
the scene and the interplay of motives and moods with the aloof 
leer of the ironist. 



This is made plain on page 207 of this novel, where Mr. Boden- 
heim after describing the vile life in jail of this Southern town, seems 
to have set down his own creed as an author: 

'*' O concrete evils of life, vileness inflicted by men upon their fel- 
low human beings, you need a cold, specific, dispassionate exposure. 
The social-radical moans, declaims, rants against you, to little avail; 
the humanitarian weeps and softly scolds; the slam-bang cultured 
critic ignores you in favor of such feeble targets as Rotary Clubs, 
literary censors, and small-town yokels. You are wiped out in one 
place only to crop up in another, or in a different guise. Since you 
can never be wiped from the earth, what is left ? The quiet, exact, 
hopeless exposures of irony, removed alike from tears and rage at 
one end and ingenious defense of cruelty at the other.* " 



Behind the raised palms it is being whispered that 
I am a crank as to "broken type." Bless you, my 
old dears, that is only modern scientific methods getting 

108 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

into the determination of first editions. A good prac- 
tical printer can tell more about first editions than all 
your experts. He knows the mysteries of make. ready, 
stereotyping, plate making and all that and you just 
can't fool him with an "old wives* tale." 

Up to a certain period books were printed from the 
actual type. Then came the "plates" and in the later 
books of huge editions, many plates on many presses. 
But in the handling of type or plates for a second edi- 
tion something must happen. A corner of a plate is 
dented when it is put in or taken out of storage; if the 
damage is very obvious, it is patched with new type, 
and, to a trained eye, that patch is also obvious. 

The "rule of thumb" as to first edition, when more 
than one edition appears in the first year of printing, 
is to compare the variorum copies in the first year with 
an acknowledged reprint and whichever agrees with 
the reprint is a second edition. But mere argument 
as to probabilities leads nowhere; it is sound argument 
that the publisher leaves off expensive features from 
his second edition to save money; it is equally sound 
argument that the publisher puts on expensive features 
in his second printing to have the book more attractive 
and to make money! Then again what should the 
collector prefer the first binding or the first printing ? 
We will assume that a mistake is made and corrected. 
The corrected sheets lie on top of the pile and are first 
sent to the bindery. There you have the first binding 
and the second printing ! Such is probably the case 
with "Huckleberry Finn" and "Jennie Gerhardt," 
for instance. 

As to the bound-in (not printed-in) advertisements 

109 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

of the early American books, a theory is advanced that 
the publisher in his first binding, particularly review 
copies^ would be careful to put his latest list of books; 
but on a later binding would not be so particular and 
to save expense would put in whatever sheets of ads. 
he had ready printed even of earlier date. An instance 
of this is the second edition of "The Scarlet Letter" 
with ads. of the year previous. 
* * # 

The following list is taken from William Dean How- 
ells' "The Great Modem American Short Stories." 
Howells was not only a writer, but also, as the editor 
of magazines, had to do with the selection of manu- 
scripts. 

MY DOUBLE AND How HE UNDID ME. E. E. Hale. 
CIRCUMSTANCES. Harriet Prescott Spofford. 
A PASSIONATE PILGRIM. Henry James. 
THE CELEBRATED JUMPING FROG. Mark Twain. 
A PRODIGAL IN TAHITI. Charles Warren Stoddard. 
THE OUTCASTS OF POKER FLAT. Bret Harte. 
THE CHRISTMAS WRECK. Frank Stockton. 
THE MISSION OF JANE. Edith Wharton. 
THE COURTING OF SISTER WISBY. Sarah Orne Jewett. 
THE REVOLT OF MOTHER. Mary E. Wilkins Freeman. 
TOLD IN THE POORHOUSE. Alice Brown. 
THE RETURN OF A PRIVATE. Hamlin Garland. 
STRIKING AN AVERAGE. Henry B. Fuller. 
EFFIE WHITTLESEY. George Ade. 
THE LOST PHCEBE. Theodore Dreiser. 
THE OCCURRENCE AT OWL CREEK. BRIDGE. Ambrose Bierce. 
A FAILURE. Edith Wyatt. 

THE YELLOW WALL PAPER. Charles Perkins Stetson Gilman. 
THE LITTLE ROOM. Madeline Yale Wynne. 
AUNT NANNA TERRY. Landon R. Dashiell. 
THE LOTUS EATERS. Virginia Tracy. 
JEAN-AH POQUELIN. George W. Cable (Old Creole Days). 
BRER RABBIT, BRER Fox, AND THE TAR BABY. Joel Chandler 
Harris (Uncle Remus). 

110 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

The following authors and books have been sug- 
gested to me as important by friends, kibitzers, and 
literary acquaintances. I have not had time to ex- 
amine them all to record my own opinion, so pass the 
list on to you. Each book must have some or great 
merit, or would not have been recommended. 



EBEN HOLDEN. Irving Bacheller. 

JOHN BROWN'S BODY. Stephen Vincent Benet. 

THE GREEN BAY TREE. Louis Bromfield. 

TIGER. Witter Bynner. 

GET RICH QUICK. WALLINGFORD. George Randolph Chester. 

CONISTON, RICHARD CARVEL, THE CRISIS. Winston Churchill. 

THE ENORMOUS ROOM. E. E. Cummings. 

MOON CALF. Floyd Dell. 

THE CLIFF DWELLERS. Henry B. Fuller. 

THE ROMANTIC COMEDIANS. Ellen Glasgow. 

THE SUN ALSO RISES. Ernest Hemingway. 

ROAN STALLION AND OTHER POEMS. Robinson Jeffers. 

THE COUNTRY OF THE POINTED FIRS. Sarah Orne Jewett. 

LITTLE CITIZENS. Myra Kelly. 

THE QUEST OF THE GOLDEN GIRL AN OLD COUNTRY HOUSE. Rich- 
ard Le Gallienne. 

THE CONGO WHEN GENERAL BOOTH ENTERS HEAVEN. Vachel 
Lindsay. 

STRINGTOWN ON THE PIKE. John Uri Lloyd. 

GRAPHICS. Harris Merton Lyon. 

THE WILD PARTY. Joseph Moncure March. 

EMMY Lou. George Madden Martin. 

THE SONG OF HUGH GLASS. John G. Neihardt. 

QUINCY ADAMS SAWYER. Charles Felton Pidgin. 

LUSTRA. Ezra Pound. 

THE RED MARK. John Russell. 

MR. INCOUL'S MISADVENTURE. Edgar Saltus. 

THREE LIVES. Gertrude Stein. 

LYRICS. John B. Tabb. 

THE STORY OF KENNETT. Bayard Taylor. 

CANE. Jean Toomer. 

DARIUS GREEN AND His FLYING MACHINE. John Townsend Trow- 
bridge. 

Ill 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

PETER. WHIFFLE. Carl van Vechten. 

POEMS OF PASSION. Ella Wheeler Wilcox. 

THE BRIDGE OF SAN Luis REY. Thornton Wilder. 

* * * 

A published consensus of a list of the best books in 
the English language gives Shakespeare a maximum 
of 31 points. The first American book to appear is 
"The Scarlet Letter" with 19 points. "The Last 
of the Mohicans" follows with 18, pressed by other 
Coopers, "The Spy," and "The Deerslayen" Evange- 
line gets 15, and "Huck Finn" scores 13 over "Tom 
Sawyer's" n. Irving's "Sketch Book" gets n. 



The "mystery story" fan has always to be catered 
to. Wasn't it Anna Katherine Green Rohlfs who 
wrote "The Leavenworth Case"; and Mary Roberts 
Rinehart, the author of the "Circular Staircase" ? 
And how about White and Adams' "The Mystery " ? 
White once wrote an admirer: "No doubt I wrote 
those parts of the story you think are best. If you 
ask Adams he will probably claim them !" 

* * * 

Did you know that W. Clark Russell was born in 
New York City ? Why, then, should we not list, his 
"Wreck of the Grosvenor"? England has claimed 
that Pole, Conrad, as we claim that citizen of the 
world, Hearn. As in athletics, they are native when 
they win and foreign when they lose. 

* * * 

John T. Winterich, in The Publishers 9 Weekly^ has 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

this to say of the pleasures of prophecy in the first- 
edition field: 

"My selection of the gods of the future is confined solely to Amer- 
ican writers because there will be no difficulty met in procuring their 
first editions as they come from the publishers, and at the regular 
published prices. Another and far more important reason for con- 
fining the choice to Americans is the gratifying fact that there is 
more promise and vitality among this than any other class in the 
world to-day. First are to be considered the novelists who are in- 
terpreting, according to their various lights, the life, color and 
movement of our times, all artists, some of the first water, others 
showing potentialities of future greatness. 

"One of the writer's prime favorities, Thomas Beer, who has a 
new volume appearing this spring; Louis Bromfield, our own Gals- 
worthy; Donald Corley, heir apparent to the throne of Cabell; 
Roark Bradford, lineal descendant of Uncle Remus; Julian Green, 
the brilliant young Franco-American; Jacland Marmen, a budding 
young Conrad; Ernest Hemingway, already famous for his muscular 
exposition of expatriates; Eleanor Chilton, sorceress of beautiful 
images; Ruth Suckow, Glenway Westcott, Elizabeth M. Roberts, 
Julia Peterkin, Thornton Wilder, Philip Wylie, Scott Fitzgerald and 
DuBose Heyward. 

"Next come the poets, some singing songs of Araby, others lend- 
ing serious ear to our daily rhythms. New England finds another 
interpreter worth mentioning in the same breath with Robert Frost 
in Raymond Holden. Nearly all critics would agree that 'Spoon 
River Anthology* is the most distinguished volume of verse since 
Whitman's 'Leaves of Grass'; Donald Davidson, who owes not a 
little to Masters, is capable of matching * Spoon River'; George 
O'Neil, conjuror of verses; those rebellious youths, Marianne Moore 
and E. E. Cummings. 'Boy in the Wind,' by George Dillon, was 
hailed as the most remarkable volume of verse since Edna St. Vin- 
cent Millay. The eloquent Lew Sarrett, Elizabeth Coatsworth, 
Louise Bogan and Allen Tate. Not the least significant of contribu- 
tions to our American literature is being made by the negro, as a study 
of the following shining talents will reveal: Eugene O'Neill has a 
dusky rival in Paul Green; Claude McKay in 'Home to Harlem' 
shows what tinsel flummery Carl Van Vechten's 'Nigger Heaven' 
was; Countee Cullen sings in verse like Roland Hayes does in voice; 
Langston Hughes has discovered the deepest shade in indigo; Jean 
Toomer, brilliant exponent of expressionism; Walter White, Eric 



HIGH SPOTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Walrond, Howard Odum and James Weldon Johnson. It would be 
interesting twenty years hence to peruse the auction records and 
dealers* catalogues and see how many in the above groups came 
through as collectors* items." 



Many a badly painted picture is hung in an art 
museum because it is of an interesting epoch, sartorial 
or historical. So many a badly told tale "gets over" 
because it is of an interesting period historically. 

* * * 

One of the great book-dealers recently said to me: 
"Every bibliography of first editions must be prefaced 
with an apology.'* Meaning that some book-Einstein 
would inevitably come along with a new theory. While I 
apologize for what bibliographic mistakes may be found 
in this list I do not apologize for the list itself: I have 
done my best and only the future can judge. 

THE END 



114 



NOTES